Brampton

Here are the 10 least used train stations in Suffolk

New figures released by the Office of Rail and Road (ORR) have revealed Suffolk’s[1] 10 least used train stations.

The latest data compiles entry and exit figures from season tickets, singles and returns – as well the main destination rail users at certain stations have – from April 2022 to March 2023.

SuffolkNews has used the compiled ‘all tickets’ entries and exits statistic to list the least used stations in your county.

Derby Road, Ipswich is the tenth least used station in Suffolk, with 73,198 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Derby Road, Ipswich is the tenth least used station in Suffolk, with 73,198 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Derby Road, Ipswich is the tenth least used station in Suffolk, with 73,198 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

10: Derby Road, Ipswich – 73,198 entries and exits

Derby Road, Ipswich[2] is six miles down the line from the main town centre station and is on the Felixstowe[3] branch line.

Just over 73,000 passengers passed through the station in the last period, more than 36 times fewer than Ipswich station itself.

Derby Road station is between Westerfield and Trimley stations on the Felistowe line.

It experienced a passenger rise in the last period, with an increase of more than 16,000.

9: Melton – 67,594 entries and exits

Melton station is on the East Suffolk Line, between Ipswich and Lowestoft[4].

Melton is the ninth least used station in Suffolk, with 67,594 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Melton is the ninth least used station in Suffolk, with 67,594 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Melton is the ninth least used station in Suffolk, with 67,594 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Nearly 68,000 passengers used the station, around 5,000 fewer than Derby Road.

However, usage of Melton also increased year-on-year, with nearly 13,000 passengers more.

Trains going out of Melton call on to Wickham Market and Woodbridge[5] respectively, with the station building occupied by a butcher.

8: Wickham Market – 57,724 entries and exits

One station down the line from Melton is Wickham Market, the next least used stop in Suffolk.

It had nearly 58,000 entries and exits in the last period.

Wickham Martket is the eight least used station in Suffolk, with 57,274 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Wickham Martket is the eight least used station in Suffolk, with 57,274 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Wickham Martket is the eight least used station in Suffolk, with 57,274 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

It was formerly a junction for the Framlingham[6] branch line, which closed to passenger services in November 1952.

The station saw an increase of nearly 10,000 year-on-year from the previous period.

7: Darsham – 55,964 entries and exits

Two stops down from Wickham Market comes the next station on the list – Darsham.

Also on the East Suffolk Line, nearly 56,000 rail users went in and out of the station in the latest period.

It had a smaller year-on-year increase than its fellow East Suffolk Line stops, with around 8,000 more passengers.

Darsham is the seventh least used station in Suffolk, with 55,964 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Darsham is the seventh least used station in Suffolk, with 55,964 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Darsham is the seventh least used station in Suffolk, with 55,964 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

The station formerly encompassed direct services to London Liverpool Street, however these were withdrawn in 2010.

6: Oulton Broad South – 51,120 entries and exits

Oulton Broad South is next on the list.

Oulton Broad South is the sixth least used station in Suffolk, with 51,120 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Oulton Broad South is the sixth least used station in Suffolk, with 51,120 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Oulton Broad South is the sixth least used station in Suffolk, with 51,120 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

The stop had just under half the passengers of its sister station Oulton Broad North, with around 51,000 entries and exits.

Coastal terminus Lowestoft follows the station on the line.

Oulton Broad South saw a year-on-year usage increase of just under 6,000 passengers.

5: Trimley – 41,164 entries and exits

With just over 40,000 users, Trimley is next on the list.

The station, which has one platform, is the second-to-last stop on the Felixstowe branch line.

Trimley is the fifth least used station in Suffolk, with 41,164 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Trimley is the fifth least used station in Suffolk, with 41,164 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Trimley is the fifth least used station in Suffolk, with 41,164 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

It was first opened in 1891 by Great Eastern Railway.

Year-on-year, the passenger increase was just under 6,000.

4: Westerfield – 13,970 entries and exits

One stop towards Ipswich and a sharp drop of over 27,000 passengers brings the fourth least used station in Suffolk with Westerfield.

Located just three miles away from the county town, nearly 14,000 rail users passed through the stop in the last period.

Despite being towards the lower end of the spectrum, it is the only station on the list to operate on more than one line, encompassing the East Suffolk and Felixstowe branch lines.

Westerfield is the fourth least used station in Suffolk, with 13,970 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Westerfield is the fourth least used station in Suffolk, with 13,970 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Westerfield is the fourth least used station in Suffolk, with 13,970 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Westerfied had a small increase of passengers year-on-year, of 982.

3: Brampton – 9,390 entries and exits

Situated between Halesworth and Beccles is Brampton, Suffolk’s third quietest station.

Brampton is the third least used station in Suffolk, with 9,390 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Brampton is the third least used station in Suffolk, with 9,390 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Brampton is the third least used station in Suffolk, with 9,390 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Operating on the East Suffolk Line, the latest data showed the station as having just over 9,000 entries and exits.

Brampton had a 22 per cent increase in passengers year-on-year.

2: Somerleyton – 9,010 entries and exits

The second least used station is Somerleyton.

Operating on the Wherry Lines, trains from Lowestoft to Norwich use the stop.

Somerleyton is the second least used station in Suffolk, with 9,010 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Somerleyton is the second least used station in Suffolk, with 9,010 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Somerleyton is the second least used station in Suffolk, with 9,010 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Just over 9,000 passengers called through Somerleyton in the last period, an increase of 314.

1: Lakenheath – 562 entries and exits

In the number one spot is Lakenheath[7] – the least used station in Suffolk.

Between April 2022 and March 2023 just 562 passengers entered and exited the station.

No trains call at Lakenheath during the week, while on weekends there are trains to Stansted Airport and Norwich.

Lakenheath is the least used station in Suffolk, with 562 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Lakenheath is the least used station in Suffolk, with 562 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Lakenheath is the least used station in Suffolk, with 562 entries and exits in the last period. Picture: Google Maps

Stops at Lakenheath are on request only.

The station recorded an increase of nearly 100 passengers year-on-year.

References

  1. ^ Suffolk’s (www.suffolknews.co.uk)
  2. ^ Ipswich (www.suffolknews.co.uk)
  3. ^ Felixstowe (www.suffolknews.co.uk)
  4. ^ Lowestoft (www.suffolknews.co.uk)
  5. ^ Woodbridge (www.suffolknews.co.uk)
  6. ^ Framlingham (www.suffolknews.co.uk)
  7. ^ Lakenheath (www.suffolknews.co.uk)

A14 Brampton Hut: Why are there delays on the road today?

Cambridgeshire Police were called at 10:42am with reports of the collision between junction 22 and 23. 

A spokesperson for Cambridgeshire Constabulary said the force currently has no further details on the incident. 

Cambs Travel News shared on X that lanes one and two out of the three lanes are closed. 

National Highways has also shared an update.

⚠️#A14[1] westbound between junctions #J24B[2] #Boxworth[3] and #J21[4] #BramptonHut[5] DELAYS of around 2.5 miles due to a road traffic collision with lanes 1 & 2 out of 3 being CLOSED.

Please allow extra time for your journey. pic.twitter.com/klv9gwlW4T[6]

— Cambs Travel News (@Cambs_Traffic) December 1, 2023[7]

Lane 1 & 2 (of 3) is closed on the #A14[8] in #Cambridgeshire[9] westbound between J23 & J22 due to a collision.

National Highways Traffic Officers are in attendance.

Delays of at least 50 minutes above normal travel time, allow extra journey time.

Thank you for your patience. pic.twitter.com/sK8nUw3bUO[10]

— National Highways: East (@HighwaysEAST) December 1, 2023[11]

References

  1. ^ #A14 (twitter.com)
  2. ^ #J24B (twitter.com)
  3. ^ #Boxworth (twitter.com)
  4. ^ #J21 (twitter.com)
  5. ^ #BramptonHut (twitter.com)
  6. ^ pic.twitter.com/klv9gwlW4T (t.co)
  7. ^ December 1, 2023 (twitter.com)
  8. ^ #A14 (twitter.com)
  9. ^ #Cambridgeshire (twitter.com)
  10. ^ pic.twitter.com/sK8nUw3bUO (t.co)
  11. ^ December 1, 2023 (twitter.com)

Live updates as ‘multi-vehicle’ crash causes closure on Cambs A-road

A multi-vehicle crash has closed a Cambridgeshire A-road this morning (Friday, November 17). The A428 is closed in both directions between Cambridge Road at St Neots and the Eltisley turn-off.

The crash was first reported by traffic data company Inrix shortly before 7am. Inrix said: "The A428 in both directions closed, queueing traffic due to multi-vehicle accident between Cambridge Road (Tithe Farm Roundabout, St Neots) and the Eltisley turn off (Eltisley)."

A National Highways spokesperson said: "The A428 in Cambridgeshire is closed in both directions between the A1198 (St Neots) and the B1428 (Caxton) due to a multi-vehicle collision. Emergency services including Cambridgeshire Police are in attendance. National Highways Traffic Officers are also on scene assisting with traffic management."

The spokesperson shared diversion routes. For westbound travellers:

  • Exit the A428 and follow the A1198, past Papworth
  • At Ermine Street Junction take the first exit on to the A14
  • Continue along the A14 up to Brampton Interchange
  • Go around the roundabout heading southbound towards St Neots
  • Re-join A1/A428

Eastbound travellers should follow the route above in reverse. Road users are advised to follow the solid circle diversion symbol.

CambridgeshireLive has contacted police for more information. Follow our live blog for updates as we get them.

The best and worst Essex schools for getting into Oxford or …

A school in Chelmsford has been identified as having the best record for sending students to Oxford or Cambridge University of any school or college in Essex. Chelmsford County High School for Girls, on Broomfield Road, sent 19 pupils to one of the country's top two universities at the end of the 2019/20 academic year.

That's according to figures recently released by the Department for Education. It works out as one in six pupils (16.7 per cent) which is a larger percentage than at any other state-funded secondary school or college in the region.

Colchester Royal Grammar School has the next best record with 16.4 per cent of pupils (28 in total) going to Oxbridge. That’s followed by Colchester County High School for Girls with 15.5 per cent (16 pupils in total), and King Edward VI Grammar School, Chelmsford[1] with 11.1 per cent (21 pupils in total).

The 28 pupils that Colchester[4] Royal Grammar School sent to Oxbridge is the highest overall total in our county and the joint 11th highest in England. Not every part of the country managed to send pupils to Oxford or Cambridge, however - just one pupil from Thurrock[5] was sent to Oxbridge.

The Henrietta Barnett School in Barnet sent the largest proportion of its 2019/20 cohort to Oxbridge out of any state-run secondary school or college in England.

Some 28.2 per cent of pupils made it into the country’s top two universities. King's College London Maths School in Lambeth had the next best ratio at 25 per cent, followed by Queen Elizabeth's School, Barnet at 24.3 per cent.

Hills Road Sixth Form College in Cambridgeshire sent the highest number of any state-run school or college, with 59 in total. That’s followed by Brampton Manor Academy in Newham with 53, Brighton Hove and Sussex Sixth Form College with 50, and Peter Symonds College in Hampshire with 43.

You can search this table to see how your school or prospective school compares in terms of the number of students it sends to Oxbridge .

References

  1. ^ Chelmsford (www.essexlive.news)
  2. ^ Loose Women star Stacey Solomon 'proud' as she makes giant DIY nutcracker for Christmas for a fraction of the price to buy one (www.essexlive.news)
  3. ^ The winter wonderland Christmas event in Colchester where you can meet Santa on board a magical train carriage (www.essexlive.news)
  4. ^ Colchester (www.essexlive.news)
  5. ^ Thurrock (www.essexlive.news)

Stunning Queen Elizabeth II mosaic to brighten up town centre subway

Images of two queens are set to brighten up a Newcastle subway in new tiled design commemorating the borough's 850th anniversary. The underpass emerges into the Queens Gardens in the town centre and features Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II.

The subway tiles have been designed by artist Liz Taylor of Parleycoot, who is based on the Staffordshire/Cheshire border, made by Tunstall-based Digital Ceramics and installed by LP Tiling of Kidsgrove. The artwork portrays the two monarchs at different stages of their lives.

Queens Gardens already has a statue of Queen Victoria, first unveiled in the town in 1903, and it’s hoped that will soon be joined by a statue of Queen Elizabeth[1], designed and sculpted by renowned local artist Andy Edwards.

READ: Council commissions statue of Queen Elizabeth II - here's a sneak peek[2] | It is based on Her Majesty's visit to Newcastle-under-Lyme in 1973

READ: 'Ghost sign' revealed at former Chesterton bakery that made 2,400 loaves an hour[3] | Swettenhams Model Bakery opened in 1939 and produced up to 345,600 loaves a week

Once the Queens Gardens subway is complete, the next upgrade will be the large underpass at Pool Dam, where a gallery-style design will include photographs from The Brampton archive.

The council’s wider programme of subway art includes the whole of Grosvenor roundabout; Ryecroft subway, which focuses on circus; and Knutton Lane subway which reflects the history of Newcastle and Britain in Bloom.

A subway in Newcastle town centre will feature two queens in a bespoke design to celebrate the borough's 850th anniversary.

Newcastle Borough Council leader Simon Tagg said: "There has been a rolling programme of improving the subways ringing the town centre, cleaning them, putting up fresh designs and CCTV where appropriate to make them feel safer and brighter.

"With the recent anniversary of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth’s death 12 months ago, we wanted to do something special – and also complement the hope that we will soon have a statue of each monarch in Queens Gardens.

“Newcastle is steeped in history and the different designs on the subway walls reflect our rich heritage. Once the work is complete I think people will agree that it looks fantastic."

NEWSLETTER: Sign up for email alerts from StokeonTrentLive direct to your inbox here[4]

References

  1. ^ joined by a statue of Queen Elizabeth (www.stokesentinel.co.uk)
  2. ^ Council commissions statue of Queen Elizabeth II - here's a sneak peek (www.stokesentinel.co.uk)
  3. ^ 'Ghost sign' revealed at former Chesterton bakery that made 2,400 loaves an hour (www.stokesentinel.co.uk)
  4. ^ Sign up for email alerts from StokeonTrentLive direct to your inbox here (www.stokesentinel.co.uk)

Cumbria’s rail future in question amid calls for northern investment …

Following the news, which has been a cause of disappointment for many, and deemed smart management of priorities by a smaller number, government advisers said more investment is needed in the UK’s transport infrastructure.

UK infrastructure, which incorporates the nation’s heating and water networks, as well as public transport, needs a big cash injection as it is all in dire need of renewal, according to a report published on October 18 by the National Infrastructure Commission (NIC).

The report said that cars and roads alone won’t be enough to keep transport moving, and more investment in public transport is needed.

Several facets of the 222-page report, which took a panel of experts over two years to compile, are likely to be seen as controversial by the government.

These include public transport investment being accompanied by restrictions on car access in England’s largest cities to alleviate congestion, and the view in the report that the HS2 decision was ‘deeply disappointing’ and ‘leaves a major gap in the UK’s rail strategy’, with Sir John Armitt, NIC chair, saying it would result in an ‘overload’ of the West Coast Mainline (from Scotland to London via Cumbria and Lancashire), or encourage more people and freight on to the roads.

Another one of the NIC’s core recommendations is improving underperforming parts of the national road network and developing a new comprehensive and long-term rail plan which ‘will bring productivity benefits to city regions across the North and the Midlands’.

This report has been received very well by Transport for the North, a major advisory group to the government.

Its chair, Lord McLoughlin, said of the report: “We welcome this assessment from the National Infrastructure Commission and especially its recognition of the key role improved connectivity has to play in unlocking the potential of the North’s city regions and towns.

“The evidence is clear, investing in the North’s transport system will make a difference for both residents and businesses, connecting people and places with opportunities and services.

“To realise this transformation, we must deliver on agreed priorities, and make it easier to do so.

“This updated assessment by the National Infrastructure Commission gives confidence to our communities and will encourage the private sector to continue to invest in the North’s success.

“In this way, we are to deliver economic growth that is sustainable and inclusive for the longer term to transform the North.”

However, the government and Conservatives may argue that they are not ignoring this fact, and are making careful plans for the long-term future of the UK, looking at smaller, more localised transport investment proposals like Liverpool to Scunthorpe and being more viable as a result of pushing back costly announcements from over a decade ago such as HS2, and more recently, the planned ban on new petrol car sales.

Carlisle MP John Stevenson has previously called for improved east-to-west transport links and was name-checked by the prime minister for his campaigning when the HS2 cancellation was announced. [1][2]

Prime minister Rishi Sunak promised to 'upgrade' the energy coast train line linking Carlisle[3], Workington[4] and Barrow in his keynote speech at the Conservative Party Conference, saying that 'every penny' of the planned £36billion leg would be spent on key infrastructure. 

Mr Stevenson is the chairman of the Northern Research Group of Conservative MPs who have called for the 'Charles' line which would see high-speed rail delivered from Manchester to Hull and the prime minister confirmed that the route would also see an upgrade. 

The Energy Coast Rail upgrade would see more space for freight and passenger trains and improve the reliability of the line more broadly – both essential to support inward investment and to meet the needs of businesses and communities along the length of the line and the wider rail network.

However, RMT general secretary Mick Lynch cast doubts on the line upgrade, saying he doesn’t believe any of the projects announced by the government will happen.

“I don’t believe any of it,” said Mr Lynch, speaking to the News and Star.

“When the Tories say something, a day later it normally collapses under scrutiny, and you've got to read the small print.

“None of this is going to happen under this government, none of it is even committed to.

“They’re going to deliver trams that already exist in Manchester, so I don't believe any of it, I don't think anyone believes any of it.

“I think they're just fiddling the figures and fiddling the rhetoric to just get them through conferences whenever they're under scrutiny.

“So, the creation of new railways or reinvestment and enhancements of railways is the same as the 40 hospitals that we're never going to see - it's in the same category of fantasy politics.”

At the time of the announcement, Cumberland Council said they were ‘pleased’ to hear of the government’s plans for the energy coast line but slammed the government for the ‘genuinely disappointing’ decision to scrap HS2 north of Birmingham.

The plans have been dismissed by Labour as a ‘back of a fag packet plan’ and shadow transport secretary, Louise Haigh said the prime minister "should take responsibility for the sheer chaos, incompetence and desperation" surrounding the announcement.

Brian Wernham, a Lib Dem councillor and parliamentary candidate in Carlisle, hopes to see more investment made to improve the Carlisle to Newcastle line.

Trains from Carlisle to Newcastle can take up to one hour and 40 minutes but Cllr Wernham called for journey times of just 45 minutes between the cities, but also Carlisle and Whitehaven[5].

He said shorter journey times would take cars off the road and be beneficial to the region’s economy, and plans would see a fast train running alongside a stopper service calling at the smaller stations like Brampton and Haydon Bridge.

“I was initially supportive of HS2,” said Cllr Wernham, “but a decade of mismanagement from the government and concentrating entirely on the south has meant we’re essentially going to get a very expensive train set running from Birmingham to London.

“It won’t take any of the pressure off existing lines unless you’re going from Curzon Street to West London – it’s an incredibly expensive white elephant.

“Instead, at one-thousandth of the cost, we could have fast trains taking 45 minutes between Newcastle and Carlisle and Carlisle and Whitehaven[6] which would take cars off the road and open up Carlisle to surrounding areas.

“I talk to people all across the city about how they haven’t been able to access medical appointments in Newcastle, Hexham and Whitehaven as it is just not feasible at the moment.”

Carlisle’s Conservative MP, John Stevenson said that idea ‘would be nice’ but that plans must be ‘realistic’ and ‘achievable.’

While energy formed the core of the NIC’s report, including free installation of heat pumps in homes to save people money as a major recommendation, this week’s publishing adds to a heap of calls for better, more reliable, and cost-effective public transport in the North.

References

  1. ^ Carlisle (www.newsandstar.co.uk)
  2. ^ prime minister for his campaigning when the HS2 cancellation was announced.  (www.newsandstar.co.uk)
  3. ^ Carlisle (www.newsandstar.co.uk)
  4. ^ Workington (www.newsandstar.co.uk)
  5. ^ Whitehaven (www.newsandstar.co.uk)
  6. ^ Whitehaven (www.newsandstar.co.uk)

Storm Babet: Watch as lorry drives through flood pushing car into …

Travis Perkins have launched an investigation after their lorry has driven through deep water, pushing a car into a building and water into a pub in Chesterfield. (Photo: submitted)

Travis Perkins have launched an investigation after their lorry has driven through deep water, pushing a car into a building and water into a pub in Chesterfield. (Photo: submitted)

The incident took place earlier today, on October 20, on the junction of Chatsworth Road and Factory Street in Chesterfield.

The footage recorded by a witness shows a Travis Perkins lorry driving through deep flood water, creating a wave that pushes a car into a building and excess water into The Anchor Pub in Brampton.

Following the incident, a spokesperson for Travis Perkins said: “We take road safety very seriously. We are aware of this incident and have launched an immediate investigation.”

MORE ON THE FLOODS: Storm Babet: Watch as video shows extent of damage caused by floods as major incident declared across Derbyshire and Chesterfield[1]

References

  1. ^ Storm Babet: Watch as video shows extent of damage caused by floods as major incident declared across Derbyshire and Chesterfield (www.derbyshiretimes.co.uk)

M11, A14, A1 and A47 road closures around Cambs to be aware of …

A number of overnight road closures are in place across Cambridgeshire[1] this week that could affect your journeys. National Highways have updated their database on main routes around the country.

Some of the works include barrier repairs, maintenance and horticulture. Traffic may be diverted whilst the roads are closed, causing delays up and down the county.

We've compiled a list of all the major roads in and around Cambridgeshire that will be closed to motorists over the next few days. You can take a look at all of them down below.

Monday, September 25

A14[2] both directions Jct 21 to Jct 33 - exit and entry slip road closures, lane closures and diversion routes for horticulture (cutting and planting) on behalf of National Highways (9pm to 5am).

A1(M) Northbound Jct 15 - Jct 16 - Full carriageway closure for major maintenance (8pm to 6am).

A11 northbound Six Mile Bottom to A14 Jct 36 - carriageway closure, lane closures and diversion route due to carriageway - reconstruction/renewal works on behalf of National Highways (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 11 to Jct 13. Carriageway and lane closures for electrical works. Diversion via national highways and local authority networks (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 8 to Jct 13 Carriageway, slip road and lane closure due to survey works. Diversion via national Highways and Local Authority network (8pm to 6am).

A47 both directions Wansford to Jct 15 - carriageway closures, lane closures, permanent lay-by closures, speed restrictions and diversion routes for carriageway - reconstruction/renewal on behalf of National Highways (8pm to 6am).

Tuesday, September 26

A1(M) Northbound Jct 15 - Jct 16 - Full carriageway closure for major maintenance (8pm to 6am).

A14[3] both directions Jct 21 to Jct 33 - exit and entry slip road closures, lane closures and diversion routes for horticulture (cutting and planting) on behalf of National Highways (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 11 to Jct 13. Carriageway and lane closures for electrical works. Diversion via national highways and local authority networks (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 11 to Jct 13. Carriageway and lane closures for electrical works. Diversion via national highways and local authority networks (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 8 to Jct 13 Carriageway, slip road and lane closure due to survey works. Diversion via national Highways and Local Authority network (8pm to 6am).

A47 both directions Wansford to Jct 15 - carriageway closures, lane closures, permanent lay-by closures, speed restrictions and diversion routes for carriageway - reconstruction/renewal on behalf of National Highways (8pm to 6am).

Wednesday, September 27

A1 southbound Brampton Hut - exit slip road closure, lane closure and diversion route for communications on behalf of National Highways (9pm to 5am).

A1(M) Northbound Jct 15 - Jct 16 - Full carriageway closure for major maintenance (8pm to 6am).

A14[4] both directions Jct 21 to Jct 33 - exit and entry slip road closures, lane closures and diversion routes for horticulture (cutting and planting) on behalf of National Highways (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 11 to Jct 13. Carriageway and lane closures for electrical works. Diversion via national highways and local authority networks (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 8 to Jct 13 Carriageway, slip road and lane closure due to survey works. Diversion via national Highways and Local Authority network (8pm to 6am).

A47 both directions Wansford to Jct 15 - carriageway closures, lane closures, permanent lay-by closures, speed restrictions and diversion routes for carriageway - reconstruction/renewal on behalf of National Highways (8pm to 6am).

Thursday, September 28

A1(M) Northbound Jct 15 - Jct 16 - Full carriageway closure for major maintenance (8pm to 6am).

A14[5] both directions Jct 21 to Jct 33 - exit and entry slip road closures, lane closures and diversion routes for horticulture (cutting and planting) on behalf of National Highways (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 11 to Jct 13. Carriageway and lane closures for electrical works. Diversion via national highways and local authority networks (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 8 to Jct 13 Carriageway, slip road and lane closure due to survey works. Diversion via national Highways and Local Authority network (8pm to 6am).

A47 both directions Wansford to Jct 15 - carriageway closures, lane closures, permanent lay-by closures, speed restrictions and diversion routes for carriageway - reconstruction/renewal on behalf of National Highways (8pm to 6am).

M11 Southbound Jct 4 to Jct A406 Lane and link road Closure Diversion via Local Authorities roads (10pm to 5am).

Friday, September 29

A1(M) Northbound Jct 15 - Jct 16 - Full carriageway closure for major maintenance (8pm to 6am).

A14 eastbound and westbound Jct 11 to Jct 13. Carriageway and lane closures for electrical works. Diversion via national highways and local authority networks (8pm to 6am).

A47 both directions Wansford to Jct 15 - carriageway closures, lane closures, permanent lay-by closures, speed restrictions and diversion routes for carriageway - reconstruction/renewal on behalf of National Highways (8pm to 6am).

M11 Southbound Jct 4 to Jct A406 Lane and link road Closure Diversion via Local Authorities roads (10pm to 5am).

References

  1. ^ Cambridgeshire (www.cambridge-news.co.uk)
  2. ^ A14 (www.cambridge-news.co.uk)
  3. ^ A14 (www.cambridge-news.co.uk)
  4. ^ A14 (www.cambridge-news.co.uk)
  5. ^ A14 (www.cambridge-news.co.uk)

Finalists revealed for Employer of the Year award

Brampton Manor is a care home in Newmarket that provides a range of services including residential care, dementia care and short stays i(Image: Boutique Care Homes)/i

Brampton Manor is a care home in Newmarket that provides a range of services including residential care, dementia care and short stays (Image: Boutique Care Homes)

The finalists for the Employer of the Award at the EADT Business Awards 2023[1] have been announced.

This award looks to showcase organisations that have evolved a people-centric culture and ethos. It recognises the evolution of employee engagement and its impact on the workplace.

Brampton Manor

Brampton Manor[2], owned and operated by Boutique Care Homes, is a care home located in Newmarket that provides a range of services including residential care, dementia care and short stays.

The 63-room home also offers a range of amenities and activities designed to enhance residents’ quality of life and the care team is committed to promoting independence, dignity and respect for each resident.

The judges said that Brampton Manor treats both colleagues and residents “as family” and they praised the “very impressive retention levels” of the business, which they said “demonstrates how they live and breathe those values and have built a great culture”.

East Anglian Daily Times: Jimmy's Farm is one of the finalists for the Employer of the Year award

East Anglian Daily Times: Jimmy's Farm is one of the finalists for the Employer of the Year award

East Anglian Daily Times: Jimmy's Farm is one of the finalists for the Employer of the Year award

Jimmy's Farm is one of the finalists for the Employer of the Year award (Image: Jimmy's Farm)

Jimmy’s Farm and Wildlife Park

Jimmy’s Farm and Wildlife Park[3] in Wherstead, Ipswich, aims to provide a great day out for the whole family.

The site began life as a derelict pig farm and has grown to become an award-winning wildlife park offering shopping, gardens, a restaurant and 100 different species and breeds to see.

Jimmy’s Farm celebrated its 20th anniversary this year and believes in making the natural world accessible to all.

The judges had high praise for the “unique and meaningful” values displayed at Jimmy’s Farm and said that the business “showed passion, enthusiasm and drive for the future”.

They also praised the business’ “supportive culture” and its “hands-on” managing director.

East Anglian Daily Times: The team at Morrison Freight

East Anglian Daily Times: The team at Morrison Freight

East Anglian Daily Times: The team at Morrison Freight

The team at Morrison Freight (Image: Morrison Freight)

Morrison Freight

Morrison Freight[4] in Great Blakenham is an independently owned freight company specialising in European logistics and road freight solutions.

Story continues

Originally founded in 1990, the business was purchased in 2015 by directors Lee Steward and Darren Ryan, who had worked for Morrison Freight for 13 years prior.

The company offers daily road freight services in 25 countries throughout mainland Europe and also recently introduced a customs arm and expanded its apprenticeship programme.

The judges noted that “you can really tell how important employee welfare and wellbeing is to the directors”.

They also felt that the business’ communication is “great” and praised Morrison Freight’s “significant” investment into training and its rewards programmes.

East Anglian Daily Times: The judges were impressed with SimpleClick Solutions' nine-day fortnight scheme

East Anglian Daily Times: The judges were impressed with SimpleClick Solutions' nine-day fortnight scheme

East Anglian Daily Times: The judges were impressed with SimpleClick Solutions' nine-day fortnight scheme

The judges were impressed with SimpleClick Solutions' nine-day fortnight scheme (Image: SimpleClick Solutions)

SimpleClick Solutions

Established in 2008, Ipswich-based SimpleClick Solutions[5] specialises in innovative software, mobile app and web development and design.

The agency caters for clients that require bespoke tech solutions and boasts a client base including Fred Olsen Cruise Lines, Waller Transport Services, Just-Eat, Kerrymaid, Just Recruitment, Vint-tro and Pier Marketing.

Commending the business’ hard work to instil “a great culture”, the training and development opportunities and its “real care for mental wellbeing”, the judges said that they were “definitely convinced” that SimpleClick is “a great place to work”.

They were particularly impressed with the business’ ‘nine-day fortnight scheme’, which was implemented in the hope of eventually moving to a four-day week.

The winners of the EADT Business Awards 2023 will be announced at an award ceremony at Kesgrave Hall, Ipswich on Thursday, September 28. For more information, please visit eadtbusinessawards.co.uk[6]

To find out about the finalists in all categories, please click here[7].

References

  1. ^ EADT Business Awards 2023 (www.eadtbusinessawards.co.uk)
  2. ^ Brampton Manor (www.boutiquecarehomes.co.uk)
  3. ^ Jimmy’s Farm and Wildlife Park (jimmysfarm.com)
  4. ^ Morrison Freight (www.morrison.com)
  5. ^ SimpleClick Solutions (www.simpleclick.co.uk)
  6. ^ eadtbusinessawards.co.uk (www.eadtbusinessawards.co.uk)
  7. ^ here (edition.pagesuite-professional.co.uk)

41 remarkable photos show inside abandoned buildings and iconic …

These are some of the derelict and demolished buildings across the area. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

These are some of the derelict and demolished buildings across the area. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Lost Places & Forgotten Faces[1] is an urban explorer who has visited a number of derelict and demolished sites across the county – from old pubs, hotels and factories to the rail tunnel that still stands under the streets of Chesterfield.

READ THIS: ‘Party’ for great-grandmother who 'brightens the room' as she celebrates 100th birthday at Derbyshire care home[2]

These 41 pictures showcase some of the most prominent abandoned sites that Chesterfield and Derbyshire have to offer – can you spot anywhere that you recognise?

The Chesterfield Hotel, formerly the Station Hotel, opened in 1877 on Malkin Street - a stones throw away from Chesterfield Railway Station. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The Chesterfield Hotel, formerly the Station Hotel, opened in 1877 on Malkin Street - a stones throw away from Chesterfield Railway Station. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The Chesterfield Hotel, formerly the Station Hotel, opened in 1877 on Malkin Street - a stones throw away from Chesterfield Railway Station. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Known for most of its life as the Station Hotel, it was renamed the Chesterfield Hotel in the 1980s. At that time, it was also extended to accommodate 73 bedrooms, a swimming pool, a gym and a large car park. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Known for most of its life as the Station Hotel, it was renamed the Chesterfield Hotel in the 1980s. At that time, it was also extended to accommodate 73 bedrooms, a swimming pool, a gym and a large car park. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Known for most of its life as the Station Hotel, it was renamed the Chesterfield Hotel in the 1980s. At that time, it was also extended to accommodate 73 bedrooms, a swimming pool, a gym and a large car park. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Sadly, it closed in 2015 after the company that owned the hotel went bust. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Sadly, it closed in 2015 after the company that owned the hotel went bust. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Sadly, it closed in 2015 after the company that owned the hotel went bust. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The hotel remained derelict until early 2022, when plans by Chesterfield Borough Council to demolish the hotel, turning the site into a car park, were approved. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The hotel remained derelict until early 2022, when plans by Chesterfield Borough Council to demolish the hotel, turning the site into a car park, were approved. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The hotel remained derelict until early 2022, when plans by Chesterfield Borough Council to demolish the hotel, turning the site into a car park, were approved. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Hasland House was originally two small cottages built in the 18th-century, and at some point they were knocked through to create a large cottage with three bedrooms and reception rooms. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Hasland House was originally two small cottages built in the 18th-century, and at some point they were knocked through to create a large cottage with three bedrooms and reception rooms. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Hasland House was originally two small cottages built in the 18th-century, and at some point they were knocked through to create a large cottage with three bedrooms and reception rooms. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The Chesterfield property was vacated in the mid-2000s and quickly fell into a state of disrepair. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The Chesterfield property was vacated in the mid-2000s and quickly fell into a state of disrepair. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The Chesterfield property was vacated in the mid-2000s and quickly fell into a state of disrepair. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Vandals wrecked the inside of the property, whilst thieves looted anything of value. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Vandals wrecked the inside of the property, whilst thieves looted anything of value. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Vandals wrecked the inside of the property, whilst thieves looted anything of value. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The Telmere Lodge was a public house situated in Hasland. The pub originally opened in 1981, and before that it was a large house built for the manger of Grassmoor Colliery, which closed in 1950. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The Telmere Lodge was a public house situated in Hasland. The pub originally opened in 1981, and before that it was a large house built for the manger of Grassmoor Colliery, which closed in 1950. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The Telmere Lodge was a public house situated in Hasland. The pub originally opened in 1981, and before that it was a large house built for the manger of Grassmoor Colliery, which closed in 1950. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

In the 1990's, it was renamed Winsick Arms and was run by the Owen family. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)In the 1990's, it was renamed Winsick Arms and was run by the Owen family. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

In the 1990's, it was renamed Winsick Arms and was run by the Owen family. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

In the early 2000s, the Winsick Arms closed for around five years, before the pub was reopened and renamed the Telmere Lodge (then just The Lodge as it was known in its latter years).In the early 2000s, the Winsick Arms closed for around five years, before the pub was reopened and renamed the Telmere Lodge (then just The Lodge as it was known in its latter years).

In the early 2000s, the Winsick Arms closed for around five years, before the pub was reopened and renamed the Telmere Lodge (then just The Lodge as it was known in its latter years).

Sadly, even with an iconic Alice In Wonderland theme, the pub struggled financially, closing its doors permanently in 2017. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Sadly, even with an iconic Alice In Wonderland theme, the pub struggled financially, closing its doors permanently in 2017. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Sadly, even with an iconic Alice In Wonderland theme, the pub struggled financially, closing its doors permanently in 2017. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The old playground to the rear of the venue certainly became a creepy sight after the building had been abandoned. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The old playground to the rear of the venue certainly became a creepy sight after the building had been abandoned. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The old playground to the rear of the venue certainly became a creepy sight after the building had been abandoned. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Avenue Villa, located close to Old Whittington area, is set on 0.94 acres of land and contains two large, stunning, modern build houses. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Avenue Villa, located close to Old Whittington area, is set on 0.94 acres of land and contains two large, stunning, modern build houses. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Avenue Villa, located close to Old Whittington area, is set on 0.94 acres of land and contains two large, stunning, modern build houses. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The previous residents of both dwellings were of the same family, and worked for their family-run shoe making business. They lived in both homes, creating one large site. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The previous residents of both dwellings were of the same family, and worked for their family-run shoe making business. They lived in both homes, creating one large site. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The previous residents of both dwellings were of the same family, and worked for their family-run shoe making business. They lived in both homes, creating one large site. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

They vacated the properties in early 2018, and the site was up for sale with estate agents Blundells at a guide price of £475,000. Shortly after this, it quickly became ransacked and badly vandalised (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)They vacated the properties in early 2018, and the site was up for sale with estate agents Blundells at a guide price of £475,000. Shortly after this, it quickly became ransacked and badly vandalised (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

They vacated the properties in early 2018, and the site was up for sale with estate agents Blundells at a guide price of £475,000. Shortly after this, it quickly became ransacked and badly vandalised (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Cottage Hill Farm is a 19th century Chesterfield farmhouse and outbuildings. Once located in rural settings, the property is now surrounded by a built-up area. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Cottage Hill Farm is a 19th century Chesterfield farmhouse and outbuildings. Once located in rural settings, the property is now surrounded by a built-up area. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Cottage Hill Farm is a 19th century Chesterfield farmhouse and outbuildings. Once located in rural settings, the property is now surrounded by a built-up area. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The farm was last occupied by the Needham family - Frank Needham, a farmer, and his wife Shirley. After his wife passed away, Frank retired in 2013. The farm was sealed up, with most of the family's belongings inside, including a number of very old vintage items and a player piano from the 1920's. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The farm was last occupied by the Needham family - Frank Needham, a farmer, and his wife Shirley. After his wife passed away, Frank retired in 2013. The farm was sealed up, with most of the family's belongings inside, including a number of very old vintage items and a player piano from the 1920's. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The farm was last occupied by the Needham family - Frank Needham, a farmer, and his wife Shirley. After his wife passed away, Frank retired in 2013. The farm was sealed up, with most of the family's belongings inside, including a number of very old vintage items and a player piano from the 1920's. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Frank sadly died in April 2019, aged 82. The farm now stands dormant, is regularly frequented by vandals, and has been badly trashed and ransacked. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Frank sadly died in April 2019, aged 82. The farm now stands dormant, is regularly frequented by vandals, and has been badly trashed and ransacked. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Frank sadly died in April 2019, aged 82. The farm now stands dormant, is regularly frequented by vandals, and has been badly trashed and ransacked. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Lost Places & Forgotten Faces said: “It was so unbelievably sad to see a place like this fall into such a state.” (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Lost Places & Forgotten Faces said: “It was so unbelievably sad to see a place like this fall into such a state.” (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Lost Places & Forgotten Faces said: “It was so unbelievably sad to see a place like this fall into such a state.” (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Duckmanton Lodge dates back to 1841, originally built for local iron works owner Benjamin Smith. A decade later, it was occupied by Pastor John Bennett, before changing hands again numerous times. In 1881, it was then owned by A. William Byron, before being sold in 1919 for £2,000. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Duckmanton Lodge dates back to 1841, originally built for local iron works owner Benjamin Smith. A decade later, it was occupied by Pastor John Bennett, before changing hands again numerous times. In 1881, it was then owned by A. William Byron, before being sold in 1919 for £2,000. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Duckmanton Lodge dates back to 1841, originally built for local iron works owner Benjamin Smith. A decade later, it was occupied by Pastor John Bennett, before changing hands again numerous times. In 1881, it was then owned by A. William Byron, before being sold in 1919 for £2,000. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The Lodge served as a pub and restaurant to the residents of Calow, and supported local sporting events with its football pitch, changing rooms and a shower. After local trade declined, Duckmanton Lodge closed in 2006 and was boarded up. However, vandals and thieves quickly had their way with the building, resulting in a lack of buyer interest. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The Lodge served as a pub and restaurant to the residents of Calow, and supported local sporting events with its football pitch, changing rooms and a shower. After local trade declined, Duckmanton Lodge closed in 2006 and was boarded up. However, vandals and thieves quickly had their way with the building, resulting in a lack of buyer interest. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The Lodge served as a pub and restaurant to the residents of Calow, and supported local sporting events with its football pitch, changing rooms and a shower. After local trade declined, Duckmanton Lodge closed in 2006 and was boarded up. However, vandals and thieves quickly had their way with the building, resulting in a lack of buyer interest. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Located in very rural settings on the outskirts of Matlock lies the decaying remains of a once productive and successful family-run dairy farm. Built in 1859 according to the date stone on the entrance, it was run and occupied by farmer Sam Raines and his wife. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Located in very rural settings on the outskirts of Matlock lies the decaying remains of a once productive and successful family-run dairy farm. Built in 1859 according to the date stone on the entrance, it was run and occupied by farmer Sam Raines and his wife. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Located in very rural settings on the outskirts of Matlock lies the decaying remains of a once productive and successful family-run dairy farm. Built in 1859 according to the date stone on the entrance, it was run and occupied by farmer Sam Raines and his wife. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Sadly, as life continues to tick forward, the Raines retired and production on their farm stopped. They continued to live there until Mr Raines' wife passed away in 2012, and he sadly died in 2014. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Sadly, as life continues to tick forward, the Raines retired and production on their farm stopped. They continued to live there until Mr Raines' wife passed away in 2012, and he sadly died in 2014. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Sadly, as life continues to tick forward, the Raines retired and production on their farm stopped. They continued to live there until Mr Raines' wife passed away in 2012, and he sadly died in 2014. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The site has very quickly deteriorated, and the farm is now occupied by approximately six stray cats. Some live in the barn and outbuildings, whilst the others have accommodated the main house. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The site has very quickly deteriorated, and the farm is now occupied by approximately six stray cats. Some live in the barn and outbuildings, whilst the others have accommodated the main house. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The site has very quickly deteriorated, and the farm is now occupied by approximately six stray cats. Some live in the barn and outbuildings, whilst the others have accommodated the main house. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Originally part of the larger Cawdor Quarry complex, Permanite Asphalt in Matlock was incorporated in 1989 and manufactured various asphalt products, mainly flooring blocks used to waterproof floors and roofing sheets. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Originally part of the larger Cawdor Quarry complex, Permanite Asphalt in Matlock was incorporated in 1989 and manufactured various asphalt products, mainly flooring blocks used to waterproof floors and roofing sheets. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Originally part of the larger Cawdor Quarry complex, Permanite Asphalt in Matlock was incorporated in 1989 and manufactured various asphalt products, mainly flooring blocks used to waterproof floors and roofing sheets. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

In 2009, Permanite Asphalt relocated to Grangemill, becoming known as Ruberoid, which is part of the IKO Group. The companies website states that they dissolved in September 2016. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)In 2009, Permanite Asphalt relocated to Grangemill, becoming known as Ruberoid, which is part of the IKO Group. The companies website states that they dissolved in September 2016. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

In 2009, Permanite Asphalt relocated to Grangemill, becoming known as Ruberoid, which is part of the IKO Group. The companies website states that they dissolved in September 2016. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

In 2018, developers Groveholt Ltd submitted plans for 586 houses in total for the ‘Matlock Spa’ development - with 468 of the homes to be built on the brownfield sites of Cawdor quarry and the former Permanite works. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)In 2018, developers Groveholt Ltd submitted plans for 586 houses in total for the ‘Matlock Spa’ development - with 468 of the homes to be built on the brownfield sites of Cawdor quarry and the former Permanite works. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

In 2018, developers Groveholt Ltd submitted plans for 586 houses in total for the ‘Matlock Spa’ development - with 468 of the homes to be built on the brownfield sites of Cawdor quarry and the former Permanite works. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The Permanite site remains abandoned today. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The Permanite site remains abandoned today. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The Permanite site remains abandoned today. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Realstone Ltd was a natural stone supplier operating close to Bolehill Quarry in the Wingerworth area. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Realstone Ltd was a natural stone supplier operating close to Bolehill Quarry in the Wingerworth area. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Realstone Ltd was a natural stone supplier operating close to Bolehill Quarry in the Wingerworth area. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The company was incorporated in October 1998 and was involved in the cutting, shaping and finishing of ornamental stone. It was one of the largest suppliers of natural stone in the UK and had three sites in total - its 25-acre headquarters in Chesterfield, along with works in Glasgow and Penrith. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The company was incorporated in October 1998 and was involved in the cutting, shaping and finishing of ornamental stone. It was one of the largest suppliers of natural stone in the UK and had three sites in total - its 25-acre headquarters in Chesterfield, along with works in Glasgow and Penrith. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The company was incorporated in October 1998 and was involved in the cutting, shaping and finishing of ornamental stone. It was one of the largest suppliers of natural stone in the UK and had three sites in total - its 25-acre headquarters in Chesterfield, along with works in Glasgow and Penrith. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

After a period of sustained trading losses and sales underperformance, Realstone went into administration on 18th May 2016 when it became apparent that it would not be possible to sell the business as a going concern. Its assets were then bought up by Grants of Shoreditch and all 35 employees were made redundant by early July. The site has been empty since and has suffered at the hands of metal thieves and arsonists. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)After a period of sustained trading losses and sales underperformance, Realstone went into administration on 18th May 2016 when it became apparent that it would not be possible to sell the business as a going concern. Its assets were then bought up by Grants of Shoreditch and all 35 employees were made redundant by early July. The site has been empty since and has suffered at the hands of metal thieves and arsonists. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

After a period of sustained trading losses and sales underperformance, Realstone went into administration on 18th May 2016 when it became apparent that it would not be possible to sell the business as a going concern. Its assets were then bought up by Grants of Shoreditch and all 35 employees were made redundant by early July. The site has been empty since and has suffered at the hands of metal thieves and arsonists. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Hunger Hill Pumping Station can be found hidden away deep within Corporation Wood, Chesterfield. It was constructed in 1924 to supply drinking water, and contains two old boreholes which are still overflowing under natural artesian pressure. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Hunger Hill Pumping Station can be found hidden away deep within Corporation Wood, Chesterfield. It was constructed in 1924 to supply drinking water, and contains two old boreholes which are still overflowing under natural artesian pressure. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Hunger Hill Pumping Station can be found hidden away deep within Corporation Wood, Chesterfield. It was constructed in 1924 to supply drinking water, and contains two old boreholes which are still overflowing under natural artesian pressure. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The stone-built single room building has a stone above the door with The stone-built single room building has a stone above the door with

The stone-built single room building has a stone above the door with "CCWW 1924" carved in it, which stands for Chesterfield Council Water Works. The pumping station was decommissioned in the 1970s and has fallen into a state of disrepair. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

There are rumours that Hunger Hill Pumping Station is notorious locally for many satanic rituals that once took place there after its closure, as well as stories of a hooded figure that haunts an area of the river known as the 'black pool'. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)There are rumours that Hunger Hill Pumping Station is notorious locally for many satanic rituals that once took place there after its closure, as well as stories of a hooded figure that haunts an area of the river known as the 'black pool'. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

There are rumours that Hunger Hill Pumping Station is notorious locally for many satanic rituals that once took place there after its closure, as well as stories of a hooded figure that haunts an area of the river known as the 'black pool'. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Chesterfield Tunnel was situated just south of the old Chesterfield Central Station. The Manchester Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway (MS&LR) arrived in Chesterfield in June 1892 with the Central Station on the so-called 'Chesterfield loop'; an extension of north-south Great Central Railway line between Nottingham and Sheffield route that by-passed Staveley.Chesterfield Tunnel was situated just south of the old Chesterfield Central Station. The Manchester Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway (MS&LR) arrived in Chesterfield in June 1892 with the Central Station on the so-called 'Chesterfield loop'; an extension of north-south Great Central Railway line between Nottingham and Sheffield route that by-passed Staveley.

Chesterfield Tunnel was situated just south of the old Chesterfield Central Station. The Manchester Sheffield & Lincolnshire Railway (MS&LR) arrived in Chesterfield in June 1892 with the Central Station on the so-called 'Chesterfield loop'; an extension of north-south Great Central Railway line between Nottingham and Sheffield route that by-passed Staveley.

On departing Chesterfield Central towards Nottingham the line passed immediately through the straight tunnel of 474 yards in length, which then emerged from under Hollis Lane. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)On departing Chesterfield Central towards Nottingham the line passed immediately through the straight tunnel of 474 yards in length, which then emerged from under Hollis Lane. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

On departing Chesterfield Central towards Nottingham the line passed immediately through the straight tunnel of 474 yards in length, which then emerged from under Hollis Lane. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Although passenger services were suspended in June 1963, the tunnel continued to serve Hydes Siding until January 1964. However, the tunnel's northern portal and 25 yards of brickwork were cut back to accommodate Chesterfield's new Inner Relief Road in 1984. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Although passenger services were suspended in June 1963, the tunnel continued to serve Hydes Siding until January 1964. However, the tunnel's northern portal and 25 yards of brickwork were cut back to accommodate Chesterfield's new Inner Relief Road in 1984. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Although passenger services were suspended in June 1963, the tunnel continued to serve Hydes Siding until January 1964. However, the tunnel's northern portal and 25 yards of brickwork were cut back to accommodate Chesterfield's new Inner Relief Road in 1984. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The disused tunnel has suffered over the years without effective drainage and is prone to flooding, which has reached several feet on occasions. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)The disused tunnel has suffered over the years without effective drainage and is prone to flooding, which has reached several feet on occasions. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

The disused tunnel has suffered over the years without effective drainage and is prone to flooding, which has reached several feet on occasions. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

There are a number of vacant and derelict dwellings scattered up and down Chatsworth Road in the Brampton area. Most of the houses are 20th century century red-brick, and some have been left empty for a lot longer than others. Most have been left due to their severe structural damage, and the struggle to demolish them on a busy road and with adjoining retail units. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)There are a number of vacant and derelict dwellings scattered up and down Chatsworth Road in the Brampton area. Most of the houses are 20th century century red-brick, and some have been left empty for a lot longer than others. Most have been left due to their severe structural damage, and the struggle to demolish them on a busy road and with adjoining retail units. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

There are a number of vacant and derelict dwellings scattered up and down Chatsworth Road in the Brampton area. Most of the houses are 20th century century red-brick, and some have been left empty for a lot longer than others. Most have been left due to their severe structural damage, and the struggle to demolish them on a busy road and with adjoining retail units. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Some of the derelict houses on Chatsworth Road hit the local news in 2016 when they were tagged by graffiti artist The Urban Badger, who added a number of thought-provoking designs to the front of the dwellings. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Some of the derelict houses on Chatsworth Road hit the local news in 2016 when they were tagged by graffiti artist The Urban Badger, who added a number of thought-provoking designs to the front of the dwellings. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Some of the derelict houses on Chatsworth Road hit the local news in 2016 when they were tagged by graffiti artist The Urban Badger, who added a number of thought-provoking designs to the front of the dwellings. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Sadly, on Boxing Day 2017, the body of a homeless man, named as 41-year-old David Fuller, was found in a derelict house on Chatsworth Road. The property had been empty for a number of years. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)Sadly, on Boxing Day 2017, the body of a homeless man, named as 41-year-old David Fuller, was found in a derelict house on Chatsworth Road. The property had been empty for a number of years. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

Sadly, on Boxing Day 2017, the body of a homeless man, named as 41-year-old David Fuller, was found in a derelict house on Chatsworth Road. The property had been empty for a number of years. (Photo: Lost Places & Forgotten Faces)

References

  1. ^ Lost Places & Forgotten Faces (www.facebook.com)
  2. ^ READ THIS: ‘Party’ for great-grandmother who 'brightens the room' as she celebrates 100th birthday at Derbyshire care home (www.derbyshiretimes.co.uk)

News: Latest on HS2 through South Yorkshire

The government has finally set out how it will assess the potential options to run HS2 trains into Leeds through South Yorkshire given that it has ditched plans for the Phase 2b Eastern leg and scaled back ambitions for Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR).

A number of potential routes, with some that include the potential for a stop in Rotherham, have been confirmed.

The government announced in November 2021 that the HS2 Phase 2b Eastern leg will terminate at East Midlands Parkway and no longer reach Leeds through the communities in the east of Rotherham. Instead, the completion of the electrification of the Midland Main Line (MML) (due in the early 2030s) would allow high speed journeys from London to Chesterfield and Sheffield in the same times to those originally proposed by HS2.

The Government wants to see whether "similar or better benefits could be obtained in a more affordable way, earlier and allow for an iterative approach to delivery" and is now using an "adaptive approach" to further projects beyond the core pipeline.

The £96 billion Integrated Rail Plan for the North and Midlands also scaled back ambitions for Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) and added that a study of route options to take HS2 to Leeds will be led by Network Rail.

Now the terms of reference for the study, which is expected to take two years to complete, have been published.

In its scope is an assessment of the different options for HS2 services to Leeds, following on from work done on the strategic alternatives to the Eastern Leg for the Integrated Rail Plan.

Advertisement The documents explain: "The study will assess viable choices consistent with the decisions reached in the Integrated Rail Plan. These would include but are not limited to:

- via Newark: the extension of HS2 Nottingham services via Newark and the East Coast Main Line route - via Sheffield: the extension of HS2 services from Sheffield - via Manchester: the extension of HS2 services from Manchester assuming Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) infrastructure and the HS2 Phase 2b Western Leg as set out in the High-Speed Rail (Crewe-Manchester) Bill, including a new high-speed surface station at Manchester Piccadilly - via Erewash: with upgrades and electrification to the Erewash Valley and Old Road lines, as well as sections of a new line to complete a route to Leeds - via full Eastern Leg: completing the HS2 Eastern Leg from the East Midlands broadly, as previously scoped

"During the course of the study, we intend to review the case for focusing development work on a smaller number of options taking account of evidence including costs, affordability, benefits and value for money."

Rothbiz highlighted some of these alternative routes last year[1] with the options most likely to serve Rotherham being the upgrade and electrification of the route north of Sheffield to Leeds, or the upgrade of the Erewash Valley line and the "Old Road" between Clay Cross Junction and Masborough Junction. A new high speed line between broadly Rotherham and Leeds, known as the "M18 Short Alignment" would connect to the northern leg of the currently proposed Eastern leg into Leeds.

Plans for a new mainline station for Rotherham[2] are being progressed, backed by government cash.

Whilst the Government studies how best to take HS2 services to Leeds, safeguarding of the previously proposed high speed route through Rotherham (affecting Wales, Aston, Ulley, Brampton-en-le–Morthen, Thurcroft, Bramley, Ravenfield and Hooton Roberts) will remain in place, extending the period of uncertainty for property owners.

The Transport Committee has looked at the government's decision to scale back NPR[3] and has expressed concern over the continued delays. Its chair, Iain Stewart MP, said: "One can only wonder if all of this will still be achievable within the £96bn spending envelope, or whether inflation and rising interest rates will continue to cut this budget down in real terms.”

HS2 website[4]

Images: HS2 Ltd

References

  1. ^ Rothbiz highlighted some of these alternative routes last year (www.rothbiz.co.uk)
  2. ^ new mainline station for Rotherham (www.rothbiz.co.uk)
  3. ^ The Transport Committee has looked at the government's decision to scale back NPR (www.rothbiz.co.uk)
  4. ^ HS2 website (www.hs2.org.uk)

Round-up of planning applications submitted for Carlisle | News and …

There have been nine planning applications registered or approved this week in Carlisle.

One proposal includes the erection of an open sided weather canopy at the Carlisle Hand Car Wash on Grices Croft, Durranhill Road.

The proposed canopy is currently open for public comment.

Another project involves the installation of an external step lift and associated building works to the rear elevation of a property located at 7 Crossfield, Carlisle.

However, the project is constrained by being in a flood risk zone.

A third planning application calls for the erection of a first floor extension above an existing retail unit to create two new flats.

The proposed site is located at 10-12 Grinsdale Avenue and is situated in a commercial and residential area.

However, as the general design is in keeping with the surrounding area, applicants considers it to be in line with the existing street scene.

Andersons Joinery Ltd has also submitted an application for an extension to a steel portal framed covered area for timber storage at Denton Holme Sawmills on Denton Street.

The new layout is expected to improve vehicular access and provide safety benefits.

Other proposals include the erection of a single storey sunroom extension at 74 Springfield Road, the removal of an existing modular security cabin and installation of new road gate security turnstile at Direct Rail Services on Etterby Road, and an extension to an existing office to create a new office at Chatsworth Lawn Tennis Club on St Aidans Road.

An application for the removal of a maple tree in Stanwix Conservation Area, at to the rear of 22 Brampton Road has been put forth, and a crown reduction is planned for three large trees at Carlisle West Community Fire Station on Brookside.

These proposed projects will be reviewed and assessed by the council before a final decision is made on whether to approve or reject the planning applications.

Man detained after Huntingdon A-road shut and railway line blocked …

A man has been detained after police were called to concerns for his welfare near a Cambridgeshire railway bridge. The A1307 Hinchingbrooke Park Road in Huntingdon was closed in both directions as a result of the incident.

The closure was in place between B1514 Brampton Road to Hinchingbrooke Park Road. The incident was first reported at around 11.45am and the road had reopened by 1pm.

Inrix, the traffic data company, said: "A1307 Hinchingbrooke Park Road in both directions re-opened, traffic easing, police incident over from B1514 Brampton Road to Hinchingbrooke Park Road. Sensors show the road has re-opened."

A Cambridgeshire Police spokesperson said: ""A call came into us at 11.25am this morning (Friday) about a man in a mental health crisis in Brampton Road, Huntingdon. We have been working alongside British Transport Police officers and the man has now been safely detained under the Mental Health Act."

Trains were unable to run but railway lines have now reopened. Delays and disruption to rail services continued until around 1pm.

A Great Northern Rail spokesperson said: "Disruption caused by the emergency services dealing with an incident earlier today between St Neots and Peterborough has now ended. Services are no longer affected by this problem."

Check out this week’s Hunts Post Letters to the Editor

On May 16, there was something on in Priory Park, in St Neots and the car parking was all along Huntingdon Road, from the mini roundabouts at the bottom of Priory Hill, solid until the park entrance.

No passing spaces, just solid parking. Given the fact that someone decided to paint double yellows down Priory Hill, I understand it was to stop rail users parking there, they have just moved the problem to Huntingdon Road, and what a problem it is.

So come 6pm the road was grid locked. Tempers were frayed, horns were sounded and drivers got so frustrated that they sped along because some minutia of a space had opened up 100 yards away.

Then, given the fact, that this road is narrower than the Hill, drivers think it quite alright to drive along the pavement, irrespective of whether there are people on it.

Last year all this happened again. I brought it up with St Neots Town Council, Huntingdonshire District Council and Cambridgeshire County Council, and they all blamed each other and all said there was nothing they could do.

I even got clipped by a wing mirror by some ‘lovely driver’ who thought it a great idea to drive on the pavement. Yet, no council helped me.

How can this be okay? What is happening now is ridiculous, dangerous and shows not an ounce of common sense.  

Last year, I was told it was a matter for the organisers of events to encourage drivers to use Almond Road and to get permission from local schools to allow them to park in their car parks.

Clearly this has not even been mentioned as everyone is parking on Huntingdon Road.

If parking is to be allowed to stay on Huntingdon Road then at least use some common sense, and put bollards out to create passing points.

If drivers are unable to pass, then that is where the issues starts.

The road is not wide enough for three lanes of traffic, so people are just using the pavement.

As a matter of info, it is an offence to drive on a pavement. Rule 145 states you are not allowed to drive on the pavement, unless in an emergency. And I don’t think getting home for your supper is an emergency!!

Also, why are Cambridgeshie Police turning a blind eye to this issue?

Someone somewhere surely could help ?

S Critcher

St Neots

Will it be goats next?

I refer to the patch of grassland know as Beatty Woods in St Neots.

The council stopped mowing in mid April. It has now become overgrown waste land, unfit for anything and even dog walkers don't use it any more. 

Whoever dreamed up the No May May idea hasn't got a clue about how birds feed.

I guess the next bright idea to come up would be to have goats or alpacas tethered there, which would at least something useful.

Lastly who's going to clear up after it is eventual mowed or will they just leave it.

Mike Friend

Beatty Road

The River Great Ouse was topic

A study day on this topic of the River Great Ouse was held by the Cambridgeshire Alliance of Lifelong Learners (CALL), at Great Stukeley on Saturday, May 13.

Two good speakers each gave two hour-long illustrated talks, with intervals for tea breaks and attendees’ packed lunches.

The morning session, on the geology of the area and on mill structures, was given by Keith Grimwade.

The Domesday Book recorded 13 watermills between Brampton and St Ives, with the Hemingfords.

Some may have existed from the Danelaw period in the ninth century, but, by the 1,300s, these had become big enterprises of national importance.

One mill was owned by Aubrey de Vere, one of William I’s barons, and three were owned by Ramsey Abbey.

Keith’s research into 14th century legal records had revealed many accounts of litigation between mill-owners carrying out work to maximise their revenue and local residents for whom that work proved a nuisance.

In the afternoon, the speaker was Bridget Flanagan, author of a book on the St Ives painters.

She devoted one session to the artists, significant in the period 1880 to 1930, including Robert Farren, who painted the mills before they were lost, (except Houghton Mill), and the celebrated Walter Dendy Sadler.

Her second talk was about leisure on the Ouse, a ‘golden age’ after the decline of the river’s industrial and commercial use, caused by 19th century transport developments. Recreation and sports included angling and shooting, rowing and punting, even winter skating.

CALL Chair Vera Williams thanked the speakers for their stimulating presentations, which merited the applause from the sizeable audience.

Dan Beck