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‘Migrants’ attack lorry at Calais with iron bars and breeze blocks

British lorry driver tells how his truck was attacked by migrants wielding iron bars and breeze blocks in desperate ‘attempt to cross channel’

  • E.M.Rogers Transport has reported that one of its lorries was attacked in Calais
  • Owner Ed Rogers told the MailOnline the road was blocked by migrants in France
  • Windscreen and door windows of the cab were smashed, leaving driver ‘shaken’
  • Rogers is calling for greater protection for hauliers driving to and from continent

A British haulier has accused migrants in Calais of attacking one of his company’s lorries in an alleged desperate attempt to cross the English channel.

Ed Rogers, owner of E.M. Rogers Transport, told the MailOnline that one of his lorries was attacked in France[2] with iron bars and breeze blocks in a road ambush.

The windscreen and door windows of the truck were smashed, and Mr Rogers said the driver was left feeling ‘very shaken and upset’ by the incident.

A British haulier has accused migrants in Calais of attacking one of their lorries in an alleged desperate attempt to cross the English channel

A British haulier has accused migrants in Calais of attacking one of their lorries in an alleged desperate attempt to cross the English channel

Ed Rogers, owner of E.M.Rogers Transport, told the MailOnline that one of his lorries was attacked in France with iron bars and breeze blocks in a road ambush

Ed Rogers, owner of E.M.Rogers Transport, told the MailOnline that one of his lorries was attacked in France with iron bars and breeze blocks in a road ambush

A British haulier has accused migrants in Calais of attacking one of their lorries in an alleged desperate attempt to cross the English channel. Ed Rogers, owner of E.M.Rogers Transport, told the MailOnline that one of his lorries was attacked in France with iron bars and breeze blocks in a road ambush

‘The Road was blocked with barriers erected by refugees trying to stop our lorry’ just outside the Calais port, Mr Rogers told the MailOnline in an email on Saturday. 

‘Our driver tried to proceed by going around the barrier, at which point he was stopped again, with the lorry attacked with metal bars and rocks.’

Pictures of the lorry, shared by the businessman, showed its smashed windows and broken body work from where he claims it was attacked by the migrants.

‘One of our colleagues attacked with iron bars and breeze blocks in Calais last night by illegal immigrants attempting to cross into the UK. Not the first time and probably won’t be the last,’ the company wrote on Instagram, sharing the photographs.

Two large, circular smashes are seen in the windshield with some holes in the glass, while the door windows appear to have been totally destroyed.

‘Fortunately our driver is safe, but he is very shaken and upset. 

‘In what other industry would someone be exposed to this type of assault whilst going about there daily work?’ Mr Rogers questioned.

The windscreen and door windows of the truck were smashed, and Mr Rogers said the driver was left feeling 'very shaken and upset' by the incident

The windscreen and door windows of the truck were smashed, and Mr Rogers said the driver was left feeling 'very shaken and upset' by the incident

Pictures of the lorry, shared by the businessman, shows its smashed windows and broken body work from where he claims it was attacked by migrants

Pictures of the lorry, shared by the businessman, shows its smashed windows and broken body work from where he claims it was attacked by migrants

The windscreen and door windows of the truck were smashed, and Mr Rogers said the driver was left feeling ‘very shaken and upset’ by the incident. Pictures of the lorry, shared by the businessman, shows its smashed windows and broken body work from where he claims it was attacked by migrants

Mr Rogers, whose company transports rare, valuable and classic cars across Europe on its lorries, called for more action to be taken to protect haulage workers driving in and out of mainland Europe.

‘I know the world is in Pandemic mode,’ he said, ‘but please remember 12 months ago, truck drivers were considered key workers.

The government needs ‘to provide safe passage for our truck drivers coming in and out of Europe, while these desperate people trying to get in to our country put them in danger on a daily basis,’ he added.

The alleged attack on Mr Roger’s company’s lorry would not be the first instance of British hauliers being attacked by migrants in Calais.

Pictured: Migrants run across the A 16 motorway in an attempt to climb into the back of lorries bound for Britain while traffic is stopped upon waiting to board shuttles at the entrance to the Channel Tunnel site in Calais, northern France, on December 10, 2020

Pictured: Migrants run across the A 16 motorway in an attempt to climb into the back of lorries bound for Britain while traffic is stopped upon waiting to board shuttles at the entrance to the Channel Tunnel site in Calais, northern France, on December 10, 2020

Pictured: Migrants run across the A 16 motorway in an attempt to climb into the back of lorries bound for Britain while traffic is stopped upon waiting to board shuttles at the entrance to the Channel Tunnel site in Calais, northern France, on December 10, 2020

In December last year, it was reported[3] that a gang of 15 migrants left a British driver bloodied after smashing the window of his cab with a rock as he waited in a queue.

Andy Couper, 57, was left with blood pouring down his face after being attacked by the gang while waiting in his vegetable-filled lorry to board a ferry at the French port.

He told The Telegraph after the incident how some of the migrants tried to get into his lorry before ‘someone hit the truck’ and the ‘whole passenger window’ was smashed, leaving him injured.

References

  1. ^ Chris Jewers For Mailonline (www.dailymail.co.uk)
  2. ^ France (www.dailymail.co.uk)
  3. ^ it was reported (www.dailymail.co.uk)

‘I can’t do anything now for Bill, but perhaps I can help someone else’

A widow has written a variety of poems in memory of her late husband to raise money for dementia research.

Delia Redsell, 81, has now published a book, called Poems from the Heart, which consists of 26 verses about things that have happened throughout her life.

Delia Redsell with a book of poetry she wrote while caring for her late husband William

Delia Redsell with a book of poetry she wrote while caring for her late husband William

Delia Redsell with a book of poetry she wrote while caring for her late husband William

The Minster[1] resident is hoping to raise as much money as possible in memory of her husband William, also known as Bill, who died in January this year, aged 89.

Bill, who had been married to Delia for 56 years, was diagnosed with dementia about five years ago.

“Before then, it was gradually coming on to him,” Delia said. “I took up the computer a few years back and I found I could type what I felt in my mind and could actually bring it to a poem and express myself in writing.

“From there on, I have got my own page on Facebook, called For the Love of Verse, and people seem to like my poems.

“I thought to myself, I can’t do anything now for Bill, but if I can make this book I can sell them and put the proceeds to dementia research and perhaps help someone else.”

Delia with her beloved husband William

Delia with her beloved husband William

Delia with her beloved husband William

Delia, who has three daughters and five grandchildren, had been caring for her husband up until his death.

She said: “When you’re caring for somebody, they spend a lot of time in the armchair sleeping. That’s why I got on the computer and writing these poems kept me going. It was another outlet.

“Whenever I wrote at home, I used to read them out to Bill. I don’t know if he really understood but he was there.”

When asked why it was important for her to raise money for dementia research, Delia said: “When you care for somebody with dementia, in the end they don’t know you, you’re just a carer, you are just looking after them. It’s a very debilitating disease.

“I know it won’t be an awful lot for me to do, but I thought it was something that I could do personally to help others, it’s keeping me going as well.”

An extract from Poems from the Heart, which contains 26 odes penned by Mrs Redsell

An extract from Poems from the Heart, which contains 26 odes penned by Mrs Redsell

An extract from Poems from the Heart, which contains 26 odes penned by Mrs Redsell

She added: “Bill was a very kind man. He liked animals and he did weddings for years with the horse and trap. He was a lorry driver and worked for himself all through his life.”

The books, printed by Jenwood Printers in Sheerness, cost £7.99 each. To buy one, go to the For the Love of Verse Facebook page.[2]

Read more: All the latest news from Sheppey[3]

References

  1. ^ Minster (kentonline.co.uk)
  2. ^ For the Love of Verse Facebook page. (www.facebook.com)
  3. ^ Read more: All the latest news from Sheppey (kentonline.co.uk)

Navigating the minefield of the UK asylum system

Applying for asylum in the United Kingdom has become a complex maze full of mixed messages for those in need of protection — especially since Brexit. In this article, we discuss the risks and opportunities involved in lodging your asylum case in the UK.

The dispute over French and UK territorial waters goes well beyond questions about how fisheries are affected after the UK’s departure from the European Union[1]. Human lives are also at stake, as hundreds of migrants attempt to cross from France to the UK across the English Channel, which at its narrowest point measures a distance of just 34 kilometers.

On a clear day, migrants camping out in Calais, France and surrounding areas can see the White Cliffs of Dover, making their impossible dream of reaching the UK appear deceptively close. But many people die while attempting that crossing, with the UK-based Institute of Race Relations (IRR) detailing 292 known deaths since 1999.

While historically, many migrants and refugees tried to make it into the UK as clandestine stowaways on lorries and other vehicles, the number of boat crossings has risen dramatically[2] in the last two years, resulting in several fatalities.

The White Cliffs of Dover can be seen from the French mainland on a clear day, making the UK appear deceivingly close | Photo: picture-alliance/dpa/PA/S. Parsons
The White Cliffs of Dover can be seen from the French mainland on a clear day, making the UK appear deceivingly close | Photo: picture-alliance/dpa/PA/S. Parsons

Goodbye, Dublin regulation

Once they arrive safely in the UK, many migrants try to keep under the radar to remain undetected[3]. But this method can spell problems for them later in the asylum process.

Others, often those who were intercepted on arrival, meanwhile, claim asylum straight away. That means their right to be in the country or not will be assessed immediately. Up until the beginning of this year, the so-called Dublin III regulation could still be applied, establishing a first hurdle on the way to asylum to the UK.

While the United Kingdom was a member of the EU, this meant that those seeking protection in the UK who had traveled through other EU countries, considered ‘safe’ were effectively pegged to eventually be returned to the EU country where they first had been processed for asylum. 

In practical terms, however, this rarely actually occurred, either because the migrants managed to travel all the way though Europe to the UK without ever being processed in any country or because the bureaucratic processes involved behind Dublin III took so long that they they had obtained the right to apply for asylum in the UK anyway.

The UK border police invests a lot of effort into detecting clandestine passengers in cargo traveling to the UK | Photo: Andrew Matthews/AP/picture-alliance
The UK border police invests a lot of effort into detecting clandestine passengers in cargo traveling to the UK | Photo: Andrew Matthews/AP/picture-alliance

Read more: Brexit: UK government denies rumors about welcoming more asylum seekers[4]

Third countries

For example, according to the European Council of Refugees and Exiles, only 263 people were transferred out of the UK in 2019 while the country was still a member of the European Union. This is considerably less than 10% of such requests made in the first place.

Having completed the Brexit process and therefore no longer being part of the Dublin III regulation, the British Government at this point “encourages” asylum seekers to seek protection in the first country they have entered, but there is no longer a UK law that specifically requires them to do this. This might, however, change as the government is introducing new limits on asylum claims[5].

If the UK can establish you have a “connection” to a safe third country — such as one you traveled through and spent a long time in — you might still be sent there if that country accepts you as part of bilateral agreements with the UK.

Read more: More migrants rushing to UK shores as Brexit fears loom[6]

UK’s changing role in Europe

While the UK is still busy finalizing many of the terms of its future relationship with the EU — including future prospects of returning migrants and refugees to other European Union countries — certain laws still govern how asylum cases are dealt with, which specific populations are likely to be granted protection, and how immigration is regulated in general.

Migrants and refugees often use sea routes to the United Kingdom from Calais, France, but because of beefed-up security on the French coast, there's been an increase of those trying to reach the UK from the Belgian shore | Map: InfoMigrants
Migrants and refugees often use sea routes to the United Kingdom from Calais, France, but because of beefed-up security on the French coast, there’s been an increase of those trying to reach the UK from the Belgian shore | Map: InfoMigrants

It is unclear how migration patterns from France to the UK might change as the UK’s relationship with the EU evolves, but UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has pledged to work with French authorities to find ways to discourage people from making the “dangerous” journey across the channel[7] in the future. He is, however, yet to lay out a comprehensive strategy for that, as the UK-EU Political Declaration does not mention asylum at all — nor does the EU’s draft text for a new partnership agreement with the UK.

While the UK’s application of asylum law might change in the future as part of a comprehensive overhaul of the country’s overall immigration system, the 1951 UNHCR Refugee Convention, of which the UK was a founding member, remains firmly in place, guaranteeing genuine refugees the right to apply for asylum.

Refugees and migrants who have been intercepted by UK border authorities are housed in collective asylum accommodation as their case is first being processed | Photo: Gareth Fuller/PA Wire/picture-alliance
Refugees and migrants who have been intercepted by UK border authorities are housed in collective asylum accommodation as their case is first being processed | Photo: Gareth Fuller/PA Wire/picture-alliance

Definition of protection in the UK

In the UK, people may be granted refugee status if they are unable to live in their own country for fear of persecution. This can include — but isn’t limited to — social dimensions such as race, religion, nationality, political opinion or sexual orientation.

Also, the UK stipulates clearly as an additional dimension to the application process that in order to be considered for protection, you cannot receive sufficient protection in your own country.

If you do qualify for protection in the UK, and you wish to remain there, you have to bear in mind that this also means that you cannot return to your country of origin for any reason at all — potentially for more than a decade even if the situation there stabilizes. Being granted asylum means that you need protection from your country of origin, and therefore, the law does not provide that you return there at the same time as retaining your asylum status in the UK.

The long way to asylum

If you present as a refugee and apply for protection, you will be scheduled an assessment with an immigration officer. They will — as a first step — assess first of all whether you might pose any threat to the UK, and will screen your history, checking whether your name might be flagged on any international databases for criminal or terrorist activities or for a violent past. They might also communicate with representatives from your home country — for example if someone who is a known threat happens to have the same name as you do.

After passing this initial step, the UK Home Office will start to decide whether you are eligible for protection. This is also known as the asylum substantive interview. A case worker from the Home Office will be in touch to schedule a separate appointment, though the time between the initial screening interview and the asylum substantive interview might take as long as one year or even longer, depending on the backlog of cases.

Throughout this period, you have the right to have an official interpreter provided by the UK government for each step of the way if you prefer to give your answers in any language other than English or Welsh.

Qualifying for British citizenship usually takes about a decade for successful asylum seekers | Photo: Sertan Sanderson/DW
Qualifying for British citizenship usually takes about a decade for successful asylum seekers | Photo: Sertan Sanderson/DW

Proving your history

For this appointment, you and your family need to share information about your journey to the UK, including travel documents and passports as well as other identification papers such as identity cards, birth certificates and marriage certificates. In the case of children, school records might also be necessary in order to decide in which school level they should be enrolled.

It also matters whether you have been in the UK for some time already when you presented as a refugee or whether you presented as such immediately upon arrival at a port of entry.

If you were present in the country already, the Home Office will also want to see proof of your residence in the UK, which can be a document such as a bank statement, a household bill or other official papers linking you to your address. Documents that do not originate from a government body or a trusted business such as an electricity provider or telephone company may potentially not be accepted — including tenancy agreements. 

In its interviews, the Home Office will also want to know the exact reasons why you didn’t claim asylum as soon as you arrived the UK, if this applies in your case. You will also be expected to provide evidence of these reasons where possible. It is therefore highly recommended that you lodge your claim immediately when you get to the UK.

The UK Home Secretary outlined Britain's new plan for immigration on March 24 | Source: UK Home Office Twitter feed @pritipatel
The UK Home Secretary outlined Britain’s new plan for immigration on March 24 | Source: UK Home Office Twitter feed @pritipatel

After these interviews, an asylum registration card (ARC) will be sent to your home address in the UK while your case is still being processed. You can use this ARC card as a temporary ID in the UK, as the government might keep your original documents while your case is being processed.

You will also be given a caseworker for as long as your case is being considered. Should you be in need of financial or housing assistance, the case worker will help make the appropriate arrangements for you. However, should you be in need of shelter, you might be sent to a different part of the country.

Still a long way ahead before the right to remain is granted…

A decision is usually delivered within six to 12 months if the case is not overly complicated, and you will be told what you should do while waiting for the decision.

Most importantly, you will not be given the right to work[8] during this period, and working illegally might jeopardize your case or even land you in prison. However, if you have been waiting for a decision on your claim for more than 12 months, you can apply for permission to work at least with a limited scope.

While your case is being processed, you might be required to regularly report to your local Home Office center at a specified time. This might be as frequent as on a weekly basis, but in most cases is monthly. During these appointments, you are expected to sign your name to prove that you are still in the area where you said you’d be living. Sometimes, the immigration officer you meet may ask you some further questions relating to your case.

Employment is not allowed while asylum cases are being processed, but that doesn't stop people smugglers from bringing hundreds of Vietnamese migrants into the UK each year, with many working in nail salons | Photo: Imago/UIG/P. Deloche
Employment is not allowed while asylum cases are being processed, but that doesn’t stop people smugglers from bringing hundreds of Vietnamese migrants into the UK each year, with many working in nail salons | Photo: Imago/UIG/P. Deloche

In a final step, you will be given an asylum interview, in which many of the pieces of information you have already shared will be presented again in front of a panel. You can attend this interview with a solicitor, and there are free legal aid resources available in the UK to find a solicitor to support you in your case and represent you before this interview panel. It is recommended, however, that in more complicated cases, a solicitor specializing in immigration law should be consulted at your own expense.

From Home Office to home

If successful, people are usually given limited leave to remain (also called “residency”) in the UK for five years with the provision that after this, they can apply for indefinite leave to remain, that is if you don’t break any laws during the initial five years. If you are not successful right away in being given limited right to remain, you can appeal the decision, especially if you come from a country where there is known conflict or persecution of minorities. Nearly a third of all cases in the UK that eventually result in successful applications usually go through the appeals process.

According to the UK Home Office, most people succeeding with their claims in the UK originate from Syria and Eritrea; about half of all applications from Iranian, Afghan and Sudanese nationals also typically result in success.

In this context, success means that you can stay in the UK for those initial five years, with your status being referred to either as “refugee status” or as “humanitarian protection.” The rights and protections involved in both categories are the same; however, people placed under “humanitarian protection” may — according to anecdotal evidence — face more frequent reviews, especially if the conflict situation in their home country changes.

Migrants and refugees spend months stuck in northern France in hopes of finding a way to sneak into the UK and make it their home | PHOTO: picture-alliance/NurPhoto/M. Heine
Migrants and refugees spend months stuck in northern France in hopes of finding a way to sneak into the UK and make it their home | PHOTO: picture-alliance/NurPhoto/M. Heine

According to UK government statistics, 41% of all asylum applicants are granted the five-year right to remain in initial rulings, with appeals processes raising this number to around 65%. And according to the UK Refugee Council, 85% of all those who do manage to successfully claim asylum in the UK will remain in the UK long-term and make it their home country, paving the way for UK citizenship[9].

Exceptions to the rule

There is, however, a dangerous gray area here. Those arrivals who present as refugees as soon as they come to the UK can safely undergo the entire aforementioned process. The same applies to those who remained undetected in the UK and eventually decide to apply for legal status. As long as the documents they submit can support their cases and explain their situation, they will be dealt with in accordance with the above-mentioned guidelines.

However, if you were intercepted by border control officials at sea, in the Channel Tunnel, in the back of a lorry or elsewhere and you cannot prove your entire history in such detail, your case automatically becomes far more complicated.

Many people who enter the UK using such clandestine routes do not even have passports issued, let alone are carrying these with them. Many have made their way into the country as part of the criminal activities of human trafficking[10] groups, and might have their documents taken from them by people smugglers at some point in their journey. While the UK is trying to crack down on people smugglers, it is also possible that innocent victims of traffickers might get caught in the crosshairs if they cannot establish their identity.

There still are other ways to prove your identity to the authorities — for example if you spent time living in several UNHCR or IOM facilities along your journey, and they have a track record of you that can be corroborated, you might likely be processed faster. But most migrants and refugees coming to the UK on irregular routes do not have sufficient proof like this, placing them in a state of limbo for months — or even years.

Those who still manage to succeed are now also faced with new legislation introduced specifically for those who have entered the UK illegally and have then, however, lodged asylum claims that resulted in success.

Under these new rules, any refugee granted asylum after entering the UK using irregular routes will no longer be given leave to remain for five years, but will instead be granted temporary rights for 30 months at first, during which they will be regularly reassessed to check if they might qualify for removal. Committing petty crimes might even flag you for removal under these circumstances. The plans have been criticized by international organizations like the UNHCR, with their legality being questioned.

If your case falls under these new rules, which have been introduced since the UK’s departure from the European Union, you are recommended to seek legal advice.

Read more: When can refugee status or subsidiary protection be revoked?[17]

Deportations on the rise

The UK has recently picked up its processing times of asylum cases after the COVID-19 lockdown created considerable backlogs[18]. This means that those applying for protection in the UK might actually be processed sooner than expected if their cases are straight-forward. Rejections in particular will be sped up in cases where there is little to no chance of being given any type of protection — for example if your case is that of an economic migrant and not of someone who is fleeing persecution in their own country.

This effectively means that decisions will, in many cases, be handed down sooner than the regular six to 12-month wait. As a direct consequence, rejected asylum seekers will be deported much sooner as well. For now, this only applies to England but is expected to be extended to the other three UK nations as well.

Under these new guidelines, rejected asylum seekers will be given only 21 days’ notice of their impending eviction in such cases — though it is unclear yet whether this applies only to rejected asylum seekers, who have lost their case at every level of legal appeal or whether it also includes those being handed initial rejections, in which case it would mean that the appeals process would have to be launched and the case heard at an appellate court within those three weeks.

In practise, this is unlikely. However, it puts additional stress on asylum seekers, as miscommunications during this period could have serious consequences, such as a person being taken to a deportation center while their appeal is still pending.

Human rights organizations have flagged serious shortcomings on the part of the United Kingdom in this area, which the government has said it would review and address as part of its ongoing immigration law reforms.

Read more: UK introduces visas for leaders in tech, science and entrepreneurship[21]

For more information on the individual steps involved in the UK asylum process, you can contact UK-based NGOs like Freedom of Movement and Right to Remain.[22][23]

References

  1. ^ the UK’s departure from the European Union (www.infomigrants.net)
  2. ^ the number of boat crossings has risen dramatically (www.infomigrants.net)
  3. ^ to remain undetected (www.infomigrants.net)
  4. ^ Brexit: UK government denies rumors about welcoming more asylum seekers (www.infomigrants.net)
  5. ^ introducing new limits on asylum claims (www.infomigrants.net)
  6. ^ More migrants rushing to UK shores as Brexit fears loom (www.infomigrants.net)
  7. ^ “dangerous” journey across the channel (www.infomigrants.net)
  8. ^ right to work (www.infomigrants.net)
  9. ^ UK citizenship (www.infomigrants.net)
  10. ^ human trafficking (www.infomigrants.net)
  11. ^ pic.twitter.com/U75erEvZfF (t.co)
  12. ^ May 10, 2021 (twitter.com)
  13. ^ #asylum (twitter.com)
  14. ^ https://t.co/yoRZiGUJOJ (t.co)
  15. ^ pic.twitter.com/dxVU3ulyLH (t.co)
  16. ^ May 10, 2021 (twitter.com)
  17. ^ When can refugee status or subsidiary protection be revoked? (www.infomigrants.net)
  18. ^ the COVID-19 lockdown created considerable backlogs (www.infomigrants.net)
  19. ^ https://t.co/CC2Sc0qlyC (t.co)
  20. ^ May 10, 2021 (twitter.com)
  21. ^ UK introduces visas for leaders in tech, science and entrepreneurship (www.infomigrants.net)
  22. ^ Freedom of Movement (www.freemovement.org.uk)
  23. ^ Right to Remain (righttoremain.org.uk)

Teen cyclist hit by ‘bin lorry-type’ vehicle in Boston

Lincoln City Football Club has received approval to welcome 3,145 fans back to LNER Stadium for their Sky Bet League One play-off fixture versus Sunderland on Wednesday May, 19 (starting 6pm).

This will be the first time fans have been present at LNER Stadium since March 2020, when they hosted Burton Albion.

The Imps fully expect demand for tickets to outweigh availability, and will be holding a ballot for supporters, which means they have to have a season ticket already. Tickets are £20.

The club said: “We hope this match will be another significant step on the road back to full stadiums next season, and we look forward to welcoming you all back home soon – football has not been the same without you. We have missed you and can’t wait to have you all back.”

Ticketing ballot

The ballot will be hosted via Ticketmaster, which will randomly select supporters who can attend this fixture. It’s important to note that supporters will not be seated in their usual seats.

The ballot will be segmented, with 31% of capacity in each area of the stadium being allocated to each grouping. For absolute clarity, each section will receive identical pro-rata availability.

  • General Admission
  • Singing Section
  • Junior Imps
  • Accessibility

Lounge holders in the SRP 1884 Lounge and Buildbase Legends Lounge will automatically be entered into the ballot with 31% capacity in both areas.

Who is eligible for the ballot?

This ballot is available for 2020/21 Season Ticket Holders. These are fans that opted for the ‘iFollow + credit’ or ‘credit only’ option.

Entry to the ballot is not dependent on supporters having renewed their Season Ticket for the 2021/22 season.

When will the ballot open/close?

The ballot will open at 12 noon on Wednesday 12th May 2021 and close at 12 noon on Friday 14th May 2021. The ballot will be drawn on Friday afternoon.

How do I enter a ballot?

All supporters who are eligible to apply for the ballot can enter by signing into their e-ticketing account (CLICK HERE)[1].

Upon signing in, you can select to enter the ballot for Lincoln City vs Sunderland.

You will be able to add up to six eligible friends/family when applying for the ballot. A group application will be treated as a single entry, with all group members either being successful or unsuccessful. Groups will not be split.

As previously stated, all lounge holders will have their accounts automatically entered into the ballot.

When will I know if I’m successful or unsuccessful in the ballot?

If you are successful in the ballot, you will receive a booking confirmation email that will detail the stand, row, and seat, along with a PDF of your match ticket(s) and entry time.

No physical match tickets will be made available on the day, and entry will be solely by digital ticket or tickets printed at home.

If you are unsuccessful in the ballot, you will also receive an email from the Club. Whilst we understand there will undoubtedly be frustration, we aim to offset this by providing those who are unsuccessful priority, should the Club be fortunate enough to reach the Play-Off Final. Only those who apply and miss out will be given priority should the Club reach the Play-Off Final.

As it stands, we anticipate the ticket allocation to be in the region of 4,000 per team for the Play-Off Final.

To view a ‘How To’ guide on entering the ballot, please CLICK HERE.[2]

Can I use my remaining season ticket credit to purchase a ticket for this fixture?

Unfortunately not, your remaining credit cannot be applied to a balloted fixture.

Pricing

  • Adults – £20
  • Concessions – £10 (18-21, 65+, Disabled)
  • Juniors – £10

Ticket prices are automatically set at the £20 price. The correct concessionary price will be applied and charged if you are successful in the ballot.

For any further enquiries, please contact [email protected][3].

Code of Conduct & Match Experience

All fans who attend are expected to agree to and abide by a fans code of conduct. The code of conduct is in place to protect all those who wish to attend. While we respect fans will have their own threshold and particular views on certain aspects, we ask the Lincoln City family to consider their fellow fans in committing to this agreement between Club and fans and, most importantly, between each other.

To view the Code of Conduct, please CLICK HERE[4].

To view the video on the return of supporters, please CLICK HERE[5].

FAQs

Will I be eligible for the ballot?

A = The ballot is only available for 2020/21 Season Ticket holders.

Will there be refreshments available at LNER Stadium for this fixture?

A = No, to help prevent unnecessary gatherings and protect our supporters’ safety, no catering facilities will be available. Supporters may be admitted with their own refreshments; however, these are still subject to regular stadium regulations. (i.e. no alcohol to be consumed within view of the pitch).

Will I be able to sit in my usual seat?

A = No.  To allow as many people into the stadium as possible and maintain social distancing, only certain seats will be available.  Please use the seat you are allocated.

Will the Club Store be open?

A = No, as above. Our store at the Waterside Shopping Centre will remain open for supporters to purchase merchandise ahead of the match.

Will the University of Lincoln Fan Zone be open?

A = Unfortunately, the Fan Zone will not be in operation for this fixture.

Will match programmes be made available for this fixture?

A = Yes, there will be match programmes available to purchase in person and online. If you are purchasing a programme on the day, please be aware that we are operating a cashless stadium.

Will there be smoking bubbles?

A = We are not able to provide smoking bubbles for this fixture.

References

  1. ^ (CLICK HERE) (www.eticketing.co.uk)
  2. ^ CLICK HERE. (www.weareimps.com)
  3. ^ [email protected] (thelincolnite.co.uk)
  4. ^ CLICK HERE (www.weareimps.com)
  5. ^ CLICK HERE (youtu.be)