management

Lorry firm boss uses scantily clad women to advertise driving jobs following ‘Brexit drought’

A lorry firm boss has resorted to drastic measures after Brexit led to a shortage of drivers in his area.

Adam Giles, company director of truck driver agency BWN Driver Management Group, had two scantily clad women posing next to a roundabout in Felixstowe, Suffolk on Friday, as part of a recruitment drive.

The women are seen holding placards with the ad ‘drivers wanted’ and the contact details and company logo emblazoned on them.

The stunt has attracted widespread criticism with people calling it “sexist for objectifying women”, but Giles says he had no other choice.

He said: “I’m a small company. we haven’t got much money to throw at advertisement. I’ve taken a bit of a tongue in cheek stunt. It’s a bit of fun.

“I didn’t expect many people to talk about it. I’m not trying to change the truck driving industry or be sexist about this. What I’ve done, people can form their own opinion.

“The marketing campaign has been so good I’m fully booked for test drives today, I was fully booked over the weekend. It’s achieved the desired effect.

“There’s a very serious situation in the UK. The way the rules have changed about foreign nationals coming into the UK, guys are leaving in floods. It’s so difficult to employ lorry drivers.”

Related: Poll of 15,000 people reveals: PM should not be referred to as ‘Boris’[7]

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References

  1. ^ #Felixstowe (twitter.com)
  2. ^ #misogyny (twitter.com)
  3. ^ #Sexism (twitter.com)
  4. ^ #EverydaySexism (twitter.com)
  5. ^ pic.twitter.com/bmB7BUDwYe (t.co)
  6. ^ May 8, 2021 (twitter.com)
  7. ^ Poll of 15,000 people reveals: PM should not be referred to as ‘Boris’ (www.thelondoneconomic.com)
  8. ^ click here (www.thelondoneconomic.com)
  9. ^ here (moteefe.com)
  10. ^ SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER (www.thelondoneconomic.com)

Truck firm boss branded ‘sexist’ after two ‘scantily-clad’ women hold up job ads

A truck firm boss has denied he is sexist after he hired “scantily-clad” women to hold up job ads on the side of the road.

Imogen Dangerfield was ‘horrified’ after seeing two glamour girls posing next to the side of the road.

The women held placards up with ‘drivers wanted’ and truck driver agency’s contact details and company logo emblazoned on them.

One is wearing a skin-tight bodysuit and the other sports a thin boob tube, tight skirt and thigh-high socks.

Adam Giles was pictured with the “scantily-clad” women displaying the recruitment notices.

Mum-of-one Imogen Dangerfield quickly launched into a social media tirade to brand the firm “sexist” for objectifying women’ and called on others to contact them and complain.

She said: “It’s completely inappropriate. This implies that all HGV drivers are interested in girls with their t**s out.

Imogen Dangerfield complained on social media
Imogen Dangerfield complained on social media (Image: Kennedy News/Imogen Dangerfield/Facebook)

She said: “They’re dressed like sex workers. I’m not dissing sex workers. They’re selling sex, but this is about drivers. When I saw it I was horrified. I just thought ‘what the hell’.

“I think it’s sexist. I think it’s important to speak about it.”

The 48-year-old claims her messages to BWN Ltd. Driver Management Group ion Felixstowe were rebuffed.

But company director Adam Giles defended the stunt saying claiming it wasn’t intended to be sexist.

The 'sexist' job advert was highlighted on social media
The ‘sexist’ job advert was highlighted on social media (Image: Kennedy News and Media)

The image was shot during a photoshoot aimed at reversing recruitment struggles has faced since Brexit[1] made it more difficult for foreign nationals to remain in the UK.

He has since hailed his marketing stunt as a ‘huge success’ already, claiming his test drives are now fully booked.

But other haulage bosses waded branded Adam’s choice of job ad as ’embarrassing’ and ‘pathetic’.

Imogen’s post triggered debate on Facebook[2] where one user asked if she’d ‘moved to the 1970s’, yet others praised it as a ‘marketing win’ and ‘ballsy but genius’.

Adam Giles defended the advertisement
Adam Giles defended the advertisement (Image: Kennedy News/Adam Giles/Facebook)

Haulage company director Adam Giles said: “I’m a small company. we haven’t got much money to throw at advertisement. I’ve taken a bit of a tongue in cheek stunt. It’s a bit of fun.

“I didn’t expect many people to talk about it. I’m not trying to change the truck driving industry or be sexist about this. What I’ve done, people can form their own opinion.

Imogen Dangerfield was shocked about the ads which she said objectified women
Imogen Dangerfield was shocked about the ads which she said objectified women (Image: Kennedy News and Media)

“The marketing campaign has been so good I’m fully booked for test drives today, I was fully booked over the weekend. It’s achieved the desired effect.

“There’s a very serious situation in the UK. The way the rules have changed about foreign nationals coming into the UK, guys are leaving in floods. It’s so difficult to employ lorry drivers.”

Haulage company director Adam Giles defended the adverts
Haulage company director Adam Giles defended the adverts (Image: Kennedy News/Adam Giles/Facebook)

Gary Austin, training and development manager at container transport firm Maritime Transport Ltd, said: “This is shocking and out of order. The industry is working hard to encourage diversity and a haulage boss does this!”

But Mr Giles defended the stunt, he said: “I’ve got 50-100 drivers and companies who have contacted me with their story and said they’re so glad you’ve been ballsy and gone with a different approach.

“It was a photoshoot and we’ve got some great pictures, but this one picture was just taken by a truck driver driving around the roundabout.”

References

  1. ^ Brexit (www.mirror.co.uk)
  2. ^ Facebook (www.mirror.co.uk)

U.K. Trade Claws Its Way Back From Big Brexit Slump

After Britain’s split from the European Union to start the year, things are looking up for post-Brexit U.K. trade. But only barely.

The latest official data show goods exports to the EU rebounded 8.6% in March from a month earlier, while imports from the bloc rose 4.5%.

The figures are explored more fully in Bloomberg’s monthly life-after-Brexit

trade tracker[1]. They underscore how January’s dismal performance — when goods moving in both directions suffered a steep drop — was written off as more of an initial shock than a preview of the divorcees’ future trading relationship.

Still, life on

the rebound[2] always seems better after a big letdown. “January was a massive train wreck,” as U.K. Trade Policy Observatory director Michael Gasiorek put it. “This is still pretty grim.”

The numbers were somewhat skewed by a boost from exports of cars, which rose 36.2% compared with a year earlier.

relates to U.K. Trade Claws Its Way Back From Big Brexit Slump

Gasiorek explained this may be because car manufacturers were “more able to think about rejigging their supply chains” than other suppliers.

Exports of live animals, meat and dairy products, for example, which face the burden of

checks and regulations[3] the EU has put forth, fell 5.8%.

March was a hectic month in trade news, not least because of turmoil ranging from Covid-19 to the container ship wedged across the Suez Canal.

To isolate the Brexit effect, it helps to compare the U.K.’s trade with the EU to that with the

rest of the world[4]: The first quarter was the first since records began in 1997 that non-EU imports outpaced those from the bloc.

This worries Thomas Sampson, associate professor at the London School of Economics. He said overall, the data suggest that “a lot of the bounce-back has now happened and we seem to have stagnated at a substantially lower level than we were pre-January.”

Lizzy Burden[5] in London

Charted Territory

Factory Prices

Year-over-year producer price indexes, by country

Source: Data compiled by Bloomberg

Manufacturers in China have been absorbing some of the rising costs of things like paint, screws, metal and packaging for months, providing a buffer for global inflation. But as Bloomberg’s Enda Curran writes[6], some are now starting to pass on their rising input costs to overseas customers. 

Today’s Must Reads

  • USMCA first[7] | The U.S. asked Mexico to review alleged denial of workers’ rights at a General Motors truck plant in central Mexico, the first time Washington is self-initiating a labor dispute under the new trade pact between the countries.


  • Light on fuel
    [8] | Gasoline shortages across the U.S. South are expanding northward as antsy motorists race to fill up with the ongoing shutdown of North America’s largest petroleum pipeline threatening to leave the region without fuel for days. Meanwhile, the Biden administration moved to

    ease the shortages[9].


  • Price control
    [10] | The surging cost of commodities to industries and households threatens China’s economic growth and the purchasing power of its citizenry. As prices soar for everything from the copper and steel to coal and corn, Beijing has a number of options, but they’ve been complicated by policies on pollution and imports.
  • Nowhere to hide[11] | With lumber prices at all-time highs it would make sense for U.S. homebuilders to be looking for alternative materials to meet demand for new houses. But unless supply chains morph drastically, most buyers will be forced to stomach the costs. Meanwhile, U.S. importers are

    driving competition[12] for European wood, and winning.


  • Fish tales
    [13] | Negotiations on access for French fishermen to waters around Jersey will continue after the British island postponed new licensing rules and France lifted a ban on vessels from the Channel Islands landing catches at its ports.
  • Algarve or bust[14] | Airline operators in the U.K. were prepared to quickly ramp up flights to popular destinations in Greece and Spain. They got Portugal instead.

  • Not playing games[15] | Gigabyte Technology has become the latest international business to face a boycott in China after its comments about shoddy Chinese-made goods prompted an online furor and its removal from e-commerce sites.

On the Bloomberg Terminal

  • Flat screens[16] | LCD panel shipment growth will be restricted in 2021 by shortages in key components such as display-driver and power-management chips as well as glass, Bloomberg Intelligence writes.

  • Supply shakeup[17] | The U.S. 10-year inflation breakeven rate’s increase a multiyear high could be driven more by a supply shortage rather than strong demand. While inflation got an initial boost from demand recovery following the pandemic, rising product prices may now be fueled by raw-material shortages, capacity limits, and unprecedented supplier delivery delays, Bloomberg Intelligence says.

  • Use the AHOY function to track global commodities trade flows.
  • Click HERE for automated stories about supply chains.
  • See BNEF for BloombergNEF’s analysis of clean energy, advanced transport, digital industry, innovative materials, and commodities.
  • Click VRUS on the terminal for news and data on the coronavirus and here for maps and charts.

Like Supply Lines?

Don’t keep it to yourself. Colleagues and friends can sign up here[18]. We also publish Balance of Power[19], a daily briefing on the latest in global politics.

For even more: Follow @economics[20] on Twitter and subscribe to Bloomberg.com[21] for unlimited access to trusted, data-driven journalism and gain expert analysis from exclusive subscriber-only newsletters.

How are we doing? We want to hear what you think about this newsletter. Let our trade tsar know[22].

— With assistance by Demetrios Pogkas

    References

    1. ^ trade tracker (www.bloomberg.com)
    2. ^ the rebound (www.bloomberg.com)
    3. ^ checks and regulations (www.bloomberg.com)
    4. ^ rest of the world (www.bloomberg.com)
    5. ^ Lizzy Burden (link.mail.bloombergbusiness.com)
    6. ^ Enda Curran writes (link.mail.bloombergbusiness.com)
    7. ^ USMCA first (www.bloomberg.com)
    8. ^ Light on fuel (www.bloomberg.com)
    9. ^ ease the shortages (www.bloomberg.com)
    10. ^ Price control (www.bloomberg.com)
    11. ^ Nowhere to hide (www.bloomberg.com)
    12. ^ driving competition (www.bloomberg.com)
    13. ^ Fish tales (www.bloomberg.com)
    14. ^ Algarve or bust (www.bloomberg.com)
    15. ^ Not playing games (www.bloomberg.com)
    16. ^ Flat screens (www.bloomberg.com)
    17. ^ Supply shakeup (www.bloomberg.com)
    18. ^ sign up here (www.bloomberg.com)
    19. ^ Balance of Power (link.mail.bloombergbusiness.com)
    20. ^ @economics (twitter.com)
    21. ^ subscribe to Bloomberg.com (www.bloomberg.com)
    22. ^ Let our trade tsar know (www.bloomberg.com)

    mitigating security risks lorries

    A standard PAS 29000 (publicly available specification) on mitigating security risks of lorries has been published by the British Standards Institution (BSI[1]) and sponsored by the Department for Transport[2] and the UK official Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI[3]).

    The 24-page PAS, ‘Framework for mitigating security risks from malicious use’, is free to download from the British Standards website[4].

    Nick Fleming, Head of Mobility and Transport Standards at BSI, said: “This new standard, developed with operators of commercial vehicles, encourages good practice in the managing of security risks that may help to reduce the threat of vehicles being used in acts that may cause intentional harm to the public or for organised crime. The standard highlights the growing importance of physical vehicle security measures to help prevent such criminal acts taking place.”

    The spec does make the point that theft of cargo from lorries, or vehicles being used for drugs trafficking, are ‘malicious uses’ that happen more often than ‘vehicle as a weapon’ terror. Hence the document goes through ‘organisational measures’, starting with a risk assessment and like other Standards, based on policies and processes. Mitigation may include ‘robust pre-employment checks for all employees’, a briefing for new staff on ‘the required security culture’, and ‘a means for staff to report security concerns’. As for physical security, the PAS suggests among other things pre-booking of all visitors and a requirement for wearing a pass while on site. The document goes on to the vehicles, such as checking – especially when a lorry has been left parked – for anything planted or stowed on board. Also proposed is a security breach and incident management plan; and a review at least every 12 months.

    The DfT says that it’s working with industry on accreditation and certification schemes for commercial vehicle firms to meet the PAS.

    References

    1. ^ BSI (www.bsigroup.com)
    2. ^ Department for Transport (www.gov.uk)
    3. ^ CPNI (www.cpni.gov.uk)
    4. ^ British Standards website (shop.bsigroup.com)