fuel

Birmingham Clean Air Zone map, zone, and when to pay as charges are introduced

The Clean Air Zone charges are due to start on Monday
The Clean Air Zone charges are due to start on Monday

The council initiative aims to improve air quality in the city centre and discourage drivers – particularly those in high-polluting vehicles – from entering the heart of Birmingham[1].

However, that has now come to an end, meaning charges will now be enforced.

Birmingham Clean Air Zone map

Birmingham Clean Air Zone map

Every road inside the A4540 Middleway ring road is included.

The Middleway, which encircles Birmingham city centre, is not included, but the A38 and its tunnels are, along with areas such as New Street, Digbeth, Lee Bank and Ladywood.

Affected postcodes include B1, B10, B12, B15, B16, B18, B19, B2, B3, B4, B5, B6, B7 and B9.

More than 300 signs have been put up around the area to tell motorists when they are entering the zone, while 67 Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras will read registration plates of vehicles entering and leaving.

Those with high-polluting vehicles will have to pay due to the higher levels of nitrogen dioxide emitted.

That includes anyone with diesel vehicles built before 2015 and petrol models built prior to 2006, along with electric, hydrogen fuel cell and hybrid electric vehicles.

The charges are:

  • Cars, taxis and vans – £8

  • Buses, coaches and HGVs – £50

More than 300 Clean Air Zone warning signs have been put up around Birmingham

More than 300 Clean Air Zone warning signs have been put up around Birmingham

The fees renew at midnight each day (so if someone enters the zone at 11.50pm and leave 20 minutes later at 12.10am, they will have to pay for two days). However, motorists can enter the zone as many times as they like each day, and not have to pay for each journey.

There is no discount for entering each day, meaning a car driver could pay up to £40 per five-day working week, while lorry drivers could face a £250 bill over the same period.

The charges operate seven days a week, 365 days a year.

It will be the driver’s responsibility to pay as alerts will not be sent out (the only warning is from roadside signs).

Motorists can pay on the Government clean air zone website or by calling the Government’s clean air zone team on 03000 298888.

Drivers have a 13-day payment window; six days before travel, on the day, or six days after.

Anyone who doesn’t pay within that time frame faces a £120 fine, which will be reduced to £60 if paid within 14 days of it arriving in the post.

Money raised will go towards funding sustainable transport measures, such as walking and cycling routes and public transport.

Middleway marks the edge of the Clean Air Zone, but is not included

Middleway marks the edge of the Clean Air Zone, but is not included

Emergency and armed forces vehicles won’t have to pay, along with some commercial vehicles operating at businesses within the zone. City centre firms can also apply for temporary permits for a maximum of two vehicles.

Some residents inside the zone, or commuters travelling in, can apply for a temporary exemption and/or financial incentives if they earn under £30,000 a year.

These incentives, such as money towards a cleaner car, can be applied via brumbreathes.co.uk[2].

People travelling for certain medical appointments can also apply for an exemption.

References

  1. ^ Birmingham (www.expressandstar.com)
  2. ^ brumbreathes.co.uk (www.brumbreathes.co.uk)

Romanian arrested over deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants in Essex

Romanian man, 28, is arrested by Italian police over the deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants found dead in the back of a lorry in Essex

  • Stefan Damian Dragos allegedly provided the truck used to smuggle the victims
  • The 39 Vietnamese migrants were found dead in a trailer in October 2019
  • He was arrested in Italy after UK police issued an international arrest warrant
  • UK authorities want to question Dragos on suspicion of manslaughter  

Italian police said on Saturday they had arrested a Romanian citizen who is the subject of an international arrest warrant from the UK for the manslaughter of 39 Vietnamese people who were being smuggled into Britain.

Stefan Damian Dragos, 28, allegedly provided the truck which was used to smuggle the group of migrants, who were found dead in a freight container on the back of the vehicle in October 2019, Italian police said in a statement.

There was no immediate statement from the suspect or from any lawyer representing him. He was arrested in the town of Cinisello Balsamo, north of Milan, but police gave no further details.

Italian police arrested Stefan Damian Dragos, 28, on suspicion of being involved in the attempt to smuggle 39 Vietnamese migrants into the UK

Italian police arrested Stefan Damian Dragos, 28, on suspicion of being involved in the attempt to smuggle 39 Vietnamese migrants into the UK

Italian police arrested Stefan Damian Dragos, 28, on suspicion of being involved in the attempt to smuggle 39 Vietnamese migrants into the UK

He was arrested in the town of Cinisello Balsamo, north of Milan and faces extradition to the UK where police want to question him in connection with the 39 deaths

He was arrested in the town of Cinisello Balsamo, north of Milan and faces extradition to the UK where police want to question him in connection with the 39 deaths

He was arrested in the town of Cinisello Balsamo, north of Milan and faces extradition to the UK where police want to question him in connection with the 39 deaths

The discovery of so many dead people – two as young as 15 – in the back of the truck on an industrial estate to the east of London shocked Britain and Vietnam. 

It also shone a spotlight on the illicit global trade that sends the poor of Asia, Africa and the Middle East on perilous journeys to the West.

Most of those who died were from Nghe An and Ha Tinh provinces in north-central Vietnam, where poor job prospects, environmental disasters and the promise of financial reward abroad fuel migration.

In January four men who admitted or were found guilty of manslaughter and immigration offences were given long jail sentences.

References

  1. ^ Darren Boyle for MailOnline (www.dailymail.co.uk)

Live updates as lorry overturns at Skellingthorpe Roundabout

There are severe delays in both directions on the A46 Lincoln Bypass this morning.

A lorry overturned near the junction with the B1378 and spilled fuel onto the road.

It is not yet clear how long it will take to get the road reopened, however police have confirmed there were no serious injuries.

A statement from Lincolnshire Police said: “A lorry has overturned on the A46 at Skellingthorpe Roundabout.

“No serious injuries reported but roads closures are in place, as they also are close to Lincoln train station following last night’s incident[1].

“Traffic expected to be busy so please seek alternative routes if you can.”

Stagecoach has also said the incident is causing delays to its routes.

This is an ongoing incident, we will bring you the latest as we get it.

References

  1. ^ following last night’s incident (www.lincolnshirelive.co.uk)

Scania racking up green awards

Date: 11.06.2021

For the fifth year running, Scania has won Germany’s coveted ‘Green Truck’ title.

Scania five-time ‘green truck’ winner

The prestigious press test competition is organised by two leading German trade magazines and over the…

Electric Vehicle Orders Are Zooming at Ford

Ford Motor Co. nearly tripled its electric vehicle sales last month, according to a company report.
The auto giant increased its EV and hybrid sales this May by 184% compared to May 2020, marking a record number of 10,364 EVs sold in a given month, t…

Council trialling electric bin lorry with a view to buy and use them across Doncaster

An electric bin lorry similar to the one Doncaster Council are currently triallingAn electric bin lorry similar to the one Doncaster Council are currently trialling

An electric bin lorry similar to the one Doncaster Council are currently trialling

The Local Democracy Reporting Service understands that waste provider Suez had offered a ‘try before you buy’ arrangement with the council to see if they are viable for the future.

Council[1] bosses are likely to discuss the proposals following the trial which has lasted a week.

Doncaster Council could follow the lead of others in the country like South Cambridgeshire District and Cambridge City Councils.

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Both authorities purchased an electric bin lorry at around £400,000 last year.

At waste capacity the electric refuse vehicle will weigh around 26 tonnes and take around seven to eight hours to recharge, able to complete a full day of collection rounds and returning to the depot with charge remaining in the battery.

While the £400,000 price tag is more than a standard diesel refuse lorry, the council bosses in Cambridgeshire said they expect the whole-life cost to be at the very least the same – if not less – due to reduced fuel and running costs.

Sheffield, Oxford, Walsall, Nottingham, Redditch and Brighton have also trialled the vehicles.

The Doncaster Council’s arrangement with Suez along with their petrol and diesel wagons, lasts until 2025.

Suez has provided waste services in Doncaster for nearly 30 years.

DMBC bosses are looking into the technology as they aspire to cut down on carbon emissions for their own climate emergency targets as an authority.

Coun Mark Houlbrook, cabinet member for environment, sustainability and waste, said: “Doncaster Council and waste contractors, Suez, are really pleased to be able to trial the use of an electric refuse collection vehicle (RCV).

“While there are more than four years left to run on the existing contract, it was thought beneficial to act now to assess the RCV’s performance and consider this as a viable option in the future.

“Both partners are continually looking at the technologies available, such as electric vehicles which contribute to cleaner air. Reducing carbon emissions is just one of many ways in which we can help tackle the ongoing climate emergency.”

*

References

  1. ^ Council (www.doncasterfreepress.co.uk)